Absolutely necessary for a strong nation that could

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absolutely necessary for a strong nation that could run smoothly. One of the first United States coins State power is a big deal because state governments are closest to the people.
Not Stated, but Not Reserved In addition, there are implied powers hidden within the express federal powers. For example, the power to make rules about citizenship implies the power to monitor the flow of people through the nation’s borders. The Constitution lets the federal government do things that aren’t specifically stated but are “necessary and proper” for carrying out the other federal powers. There are also concurrent powers that both states and the federal government have, and that both can can exercise at the same time — as long as they don’t interfere with each other. Normally, interference isn’t an issue because federal and state governments operate as two separate systems. For example, both have the power to tax, spend, and borrow money because both levels of government need money to function and provide services. Both levels have the power to define crimes and determine the punishment for those crimes, so both levels have the power to create a justice system. But the states put one big limit on themselves in the Constitution: If state and federal laws do interfere with each other, federal laws are supreme. Reading ̶ Side B Power to the States! Name: © 2016 iCivics, Inc. Police Power: Not What it Sounds Like The biggest power the states kept for themselves is one you won’t find defined in any constitution: the police power . This is a sweeping power that lets states do things like this: • Protect the health, safety, and morals of the community • Pass and enforce laws that promote the general welfare • Limit private rights for the good of the public • Address major needs in the community While the police power is the reason police departments can exist, this power is about a lot more than police officers. Laws based on the police power can be wildly different from state to state, and they can cover everything from the kind of electrical wire allowed in new construction to noise ordinances that limit how loud motorcycle pipes can be. Each state has its own needs and priorities, and states use their police powers to address issues in ways that make sense for their own citizens. Source: TX Dept. of Public Safety Stated Not Stated Implied MORE Power to the States? When the states agreed to the Constitution, the states were the only ones with power to keep or give away. Because the states also have the power to amend the Constitution, the states could—in theory—strip the federal government of its powers by changing the Constitution. Changing the Constitution is really difficult because it requires getting a huge portion of people and states to agree on something that will become “the law of the land.” America also has over 200 years of history built on the system of federal-state power- sharing that the Founders created, along with a history of respecting that system instead of trying to change it. So a state-power revolution probably won’t happen. But it could, and that’s the point.

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