Hell fireso he who extends charity to a christian

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hell fire,—so he who extends charity to a Christian does not extend it to a Christian if he does notlove Christ in him.  Now he does not love Christ who refuses to be justified in Him.  Or, again, ifa man has been guilty of this sin of calling his brother Fool, unjustly reviling him without any desireto remove his sin, his alms-deeds go a small way towards expiating this fault, unless he adds to thisthe remedy of reconciliation which the same passage enjoins.  For it is there said, “Therefore, ifthou bring thy gift to the altar, and there rememberest that thy brother hath aught against thee; leavethere thy gift before the altar, and go thy way; first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come andoffer thy gift.”1591  Just so it is a small matter to do alms-deeds, no matter how great they be, forany sin, so long as the offender continues in the practice of sin. Then as to the daily prayer which the Lord Himself taught, and which is therefore called theLord’s prayer, it obliterates indeed the sins of the day, when day by day we say, “Forgive us ourdebts,” and when we not only say but act out that which follows, “as we forgive our debtors;”1592but we utter this petition because sins have been committed, and not that they may be.  For by itour Saviour designed to teach us that, however righteously we live in this life of infirmity anddarkness, we still commit sins for the remission of which we ought to pray, while we must pardonthose who sin against us that we ourselves also may be pardoned.  The Lord then did not utter thewords, “If ye forgive men their trespasses, your Father will also forgive you your trespasses,”1593477in order that we might contract from this petition such confidence as should enable us to sin securelyfrom day to day, either putting ourselves above the fear of human laws, or craftily deceiving menconcerning our conduct, but in order that we might thus learn not to suppose that we are withoutsins, even though we should be free from crimes; as also God admonished the priests of the oldlaw to this same effect regarding their sacrifices, which He commanded them to offer first for theirown sins, and then for the sins of the people.  For even the very words of so great a Master andLord are to be intently considered.  For He does not say, If ye forgive men their sins, your Fatherwill also forgive you your sins, no matter of what sort they be, but He says, your sins; for it was adaily prayer He was teaching, and it was certainly to disciples already justified He was speaking. What, then, does He mean by “your sins,” but those sins from which not even you who are justifiedand sanctified can be free?  While, then, those who seek occasion from this petition to indulge inhabitual sin maintain that the Lord meant to include great sins, because He did not say, He willforgive you your small sins, but “your sins,” we, on the other hand, taking into account the characterof the persons He was addressing, cannot see our way to interpret the expression “your sins” of

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