International regulatory bodies national and regional

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international regulatory bodies, national and regional governments that ensure that media services individual citizens and society (not only businesses) Rights and responsibilities: -Media workers have the right of freedom of expression; they also have the responsibility to respect privacy, laws pertaining to libel, copyright, hate speech -Media owners have the right to a return on their investment oAlso have the obligation to exert their market power and respect the social / cultural goals of their community Policy development: -Copyright laws introduced into the 15thcentury -In the 16thcentury, postal system in Europe was regulated by bilateral agreements standardizing circulation of letters across the border -Berne convention (1863): regulates the freedom of postal networks -Telegraphy: International telegraph convention, 1865 -International telephony:regulated since the early 20thcentury, International Telecommunications Union -Berlin Radio Convention: 1906-TODAY: policies are part of larger, international policy context as mass communication happens across bordersTerminology:Legislation: acts, statutes and laws that have been passed by Parliament or a provincial legislature. -Examples: The Broadcasting Act, Telecommunications Act Regulations: the rules that address the details and practical applications of the law -Example: The Broadcasting Act describes the structure and responsibilities of the CRTC find more resources at oneclass.comfind more resources at oneclass.com
Policy: the set of rules, laws and practices that govern a particular activity. -Example: Broadcasting policy Order-in-council: an order formulated by the general cabinet and authorized by the Governor General. -Example: Appointments made to a royal commission Communication policy in Canada -Articulated through a series of Royal commissions, task forces, public hearings, committee reports -EX: National Film Board of Canada, the CRTC The three main historical pillars of Canadian communication policy: 1.Theinterests of the state and the interests of the Canadian public coincide 2.Rejection of wholesale commercialization of cultural production in Canada 3.United States is a force of cultural imperialism that needs to be resisted Government intervention: -Media must promote the frame of the Canadian culture and the project of the national state -PROBLEMS: Fiscal, technological, philosophical Fiscal problems: -Can Canada afford to promote and protect indigenous cultural activity? oBudget cuts in government spending that promotes cultural activities Technological and philosophical problems: -With the rise of global communication networks, is it feasible / possible for governments to intervene in communicative activities that stretch beyond their borders? Cees Hamelink: Communications Scholar. -Communication policy: oA by-product of global contact between peoples, companies and governments find more resources at oneclass.comfind more resources at oneclass.com
oMost of this contact prior to 1800 came through meetings of individual traders, merchants, etc o

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