Comparison an evaluation of the similarities and

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Comparison An evaluation of the similarities and differences of one or more things relative to each other. Understanding The mental (sometimes emotional) process of comprehension, or the assimilation of knowledge, which is subjective by its nature.
WHAT'S COVERED In this lesson, you will learn how to bolster your credibility with your audience. Specifically, this lesson will cover: Building Credibility through Character and Competence Building Initial Credibility Building Derived Credibility Building Terminal Credibility Build Credibility by Sophia Tutorial 1. Building Credibility through Character and Competence Aristotle, the classical Greek philosopher and rhetorician, established three methods of proof: Logos Ethos Pathos Logos is the logical development of the message, pathos is the emotional appeals employed by the speaker, and ethos is the moral character of the speaker as perceived by the audience. Our focus oncredibility relates to ethos, the ethical character and competence of the speaker. To build credibility, you want to focus on three stages: 1. Initial credibility is what the audience knows and their opinion prior to the speech. 2. Derived (during) credibility is how the audience perceives you while delivering the speech. 3. Terminal is the lasting impression that the audience has of you as they leave the speech.
TERMS TO KNOW Aristotle An ancient Greek philosopher (382–322 BC), student of Plato, and teacher of Alexander the Great. Credibility The objective and subjective components of the believability of a source or message. Ethos A rhetorical appeal to an audience based on the speaker/writer's credibility. 1a. Building Initial Credibility Here we look at who you are as a person; what the audience knows about your expertise and whether the audience thinks you are trustworthy. You may think about initial credibility as your personal branding: who you are and what you audience knows about you. Your reputation may precede you but if it does not, you may rely on an introduction prior to the speech. Often a host or moderator will introduce you and provide relevant information about your background. If there is no moderator to provide an introduction, you may include a brief self-introduction about yourself as it relates to the topic and your motivation for speaking. Building initial credibility helps prepare the audience for what is to come during the speech. 1b. Building Derived Credibility This is where you want to look at how the audience perceives you during the speech. You derive credibility during the speech by what you do. Your credibility with the audience derives from how the audience responds to what you wear, the words you use, your delivery, and in general the way you handle yourself during the speech.
SUMMARY ilding derived credibility involves establishing common ground with the audience by sharing aspects of your background that are similar to the audi TERMS TO KNOW Aristotle An ancient Greek philosopher (382–322 BC), student of Plato, and teacher of Alexander the Great. If you use strong supporting evidence and explain it to the audience, you will enhance your perceived competence.

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