2 Safety is part of the professional job You should integrate OSH concepts and

2 safety is part of the professional job you should

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2. Safety is part of the professional job: You should integrate OSH concepts and procedures into your professional approach to every job. That is something everyone, from top management through the first-line supervisor to the worker, should do. All training and apprentice programs should include OSH. Safety demands cooperation among all levels of management and workers. 3. Top management and command must be involved: Top management must take the lead in 2-7
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organizing OSH, setting OSH policy, and assigning OSH accountability, Management must hold intermediate management levels accountable for all preventable mishaps. To be effective, a mishap investigation must not coerce, convict, or punish managers, supervisors, or workers. It should strive to be impartial when assessing the evidence and then develop recommendations to avoid future mishaps. The cause may not be one single event or design flaw. Management should work toward a safe and healthy operation or system through appropriate managerial methods. 4. Safety is economical: Mishaps cost money. Costs include those for damage repair, lost work time, worker replacement and training, and compensation claims. Safety specialists must advise management supervisors of how safety will reduce lost work time and enhance productivity, operational effectiveness, and morale. Money allotted to provide protective equipment and safe working conditions is a good investment. 5. First-line supervisors are essential to safety management: The first-line supervisor (shop foreman, work center supervisor, leading petty officer) needs time for stand-up briefings. He or she also needs the proper tools and personal protective equipment for safe operation. The first-line supervisor must have adequate resources and must be accountable for production and operation safety. Command support, including funding, is critical to safe operations. 6. Eliminate unsafe acts to reduce mishaps: Unsafe acts, unsafe conditions, and mishaps are symptoms of problems in the management system. You, as a manager or supervisor, must examine the symptoms to find and eliminate their causes. Lack of training, poor motivation, personality conflicts, drug or alcohol abuse, and bad attitudes are potential mishap causes. All of these problems are correctable through good management and supervision. 7. Severe mishaps should receive first priority: Certain circumstances and conditions carry a higher risk of producing severe injuries or costly damage. You can normally identify, anticipate, and control some of the following potentially hazardous conditions: a. b. c. Unusual, nonroutine activities, like weapons handling Nonproductive activities, during which boredom can lead to horseplay or unsafe acts Activities involving high-energy sources such as melting metals in a foundry d.
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  • Fall '18
  • Occupational safety and health, United States Navy, safety officer, Navy Occupational Safety and Health, naval safety center, Navy Safety Program

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