Within a year she had become embroiled in an adultery

This preview shows page 13 - 18 out of 38 pages.

before the House Judiciary Committee. Within a year, she had become embroiled in an adultery scandal, and was jailed under the Comstock anti-obscenity law. By 1872, Woodhull was portrayed in Harper’s Weekly as “Mrs. Satan” for her bold critiques of sexual hypocrisy within the marriage relationship, and for her self-definition as a “free lover.” She was among the first women to publicly criticize the heterosexual double standard.
Women Rights Movement: Radicals “A Women Rights Movement: Radicals “A New Departure” New Departure” Victoria Woodhull and Tenessee Claflin Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly 1870 Prostitution, venereal disease, abortion, female sexuality, ,Labor issues New departure: 14 Th Amendment Argument Beecher/Tilden Scandal: retreat from radicalism
Women Rights Movement: Radicals Women Rights Movement: Radicals Victorian Woodhull and Tennessee Claflin New Departure:14 th Amendment Woodhull Claflin Weekly Beecher/Tilden Scandal The United States vs. Susan B. Anthony “Anthony Amendment 1874 Minor vs. Happersett 1875
New Departure “New Departure” —NWSA’s bold interpretation of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments argued that women were “persons” whose rights as national citizens were established by the first sentence of the Fourteenth Amendment. The right to vote was central to and inherent in national citizenship. Thus, women’s right to vote was already established and did not require any additional constitutional change. Victoria Woodhull presented this argument before the House Judiciary Committee in 1871. During the elections of 1871 and 1872, groups of women went to their polling places, argued their constitutional understanding to election officials, and voted. Susan B. Anthony was later arrested and charged with voting illegally; she was found guilty but gained great publicity for the cause. The “New Departure” argument was struck down in Minor v. Happersett (1875).
Fourteenth Amendment Article. XIV. [Proposed 1866; Ratified 1868] Section. 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. Section. 2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the Executive and Judicial officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture