6 increase opportunities for personal satisfaction if

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6. Increase opportunities for personal satisfaction if the group member performs effectively. The "if” is important because it reflects contingent behavior on the leader's part. 7. Be careful not to irritate people by giving them instructions on things they already can do well. 8. To obtain high performance and satisfaction, the leader must provide structure if it is missing and supply rewards contingent on adequate performance. To accomplish this, leaders must clarify the desirability of goals for the group members. SITUATIONAL LEADERSHIP® II (SLII) Focus on characteristics of group members. Situational Leadership II (SLII), developed by Kenneth H. Blanchard and his colleagues, explains how to match leadership style to the capabilities of group members on a given task." For example, you might need less guidance from a supervisor when you are skilled in a task than when you are performing a new task.
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SLII is designed to increase the frequency and quality of conversations about performance and professional development between managers and group members so that competence is developed, commitment takes place, and turnover among talented workers is reduced. Basics of SLII A challenge in applying SLII is that the leader has to stay tuned into which task a group member is performing at a given time and then implement the correct style. Because assignments can change rapidly and group members are often working on more than one task in a day, the leader may have to keep shifting styles. THE NORMATIVE DECISION MODEL The normative decision model views leadership as a decision-making process in which the leader examines certain factors within the situation to determine which decision-making style will be the most effective Decision-Making styles
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1. Decide . The leader makes the decision alone and either announces or sells it to the group. The leader might use expertise in collecting information from the group or from others who appear to have information relevant to the problem. 2. Consult (Individually) . The leader presents the problem to the group members individually, gathers their suggestions, and then makes the decision. 3. Consult (Group) . The leader presents the problem to group members in a meeting, gathers their suggestions, and then makes the decision. 4. Facilitate . The leader presents the problem and then acts as a facilitator, defining the problem to be solved and the boundaries in which the decision must be made. The leader wants concurrence and avoids having his or her ideas receive more weight based on position power. 5. Delegate . The leader permits the group to make the decision within prescribed limits. Although the leader does not directly intervene in the group's deliberations unless explicitly asked, he or she works behind the scenes, providing resources and encouragement.
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COGNITIVE RESOURCE THEORY: HOW INTELLIGENCE, EXPERIENCE, AND STRESS INFLUENCE LEADERSHIP Another contingency theory describes how a leader's intelligence and experience can influence performance when the stress level of the people is considered . The general thrust of cognitive resource theory is that stress plays a key role in determining how a leader's intelligence is related to group performance.
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  • Summer '15
  • dyah
  • Accounting, Situational leadership theory

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