Shuttlecock a shuttlecock often abbreviated to

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 7 pages.

Shuttlecock . A shuttlecock (often abbreviated to shuttle; also called a birdie) is a high-drag projectile, with an open conical shape: the cone is formed from sixteen overlapping feathers embedded into a rounded cork base. The cork is covered with thin leather or synthetic material. Synthetic shuttles are often used by recreational players to reduce their costs as feathered shuttles break easily. These nylon shuttles may be constructed with either natural cork or synthetic foam base and a plastic skirt. Shoes . Badminton shoes are lightweight with soles of rubber or similar high-grip, non-marking materials. Compared to running shoes, badminton shoes have little lateral support. High levels of lateral support are useful for activities where lateral motion is undesirable and unexpected. Badminton, however, requires powerful lateral movements. A highly built-up lateral support will not be able to protect the foot in badminton; instead, it will encourage catastrophic collapse at the point where the shoe's support fails, and the player's ankles are not ready for the sudden loading, which can cause sprains. For this reason,
players should choose badminton shoes rather than general trainers or running shoes, because proper badminton shoes will have a very thin sole, lower a person's centre of gravity, and therefore result in fewer injuries. Players should also ensure that they learn safe and proper footwork, with the knee and foot in alignment on all lunges. This is more than just a safety concern: proper footwork is also critical in order to move effectively around the court. SKILLS 1.The Ready Stance Always having the right stance when playing makes it a lot easier to minimize the movements you need to make to hit a shot. The ready stance done by putting your non-racquet leg a step forward and about shoulder width away from your racquet leg. Slightly bend both knees with your weight balanced between both legs. Slightly bend forward from the hip, keeping your back straight, and lift your racquet up with your racquet-hand in front of you slightly above your shoulder and the head of the racquet to be right above your forehead. Raise your non-racquet arm to help improve your balance. 2. Forehand and Backhand Grip Having the right grip is crucial in helping new players control their shots better and protects from possible injury from putting too much pressure on the wrist. The simplest way to grip your badminton racquet is by imitating a handshake. Your thumb should press against the handle while the rest of your hand and four fingers wrap around the racquet. This handshake should be a friendly one. Don’t grip too tightly because you need to retain flexibility in your wrist. It is recommended that you opt to put a wrap around your grip to make it more comfortable and less slippery.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture