offers the girl as a parallel to the wine and bread Jesus offers His followers

Offers the girl as a parallel to the wine and bread

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offers the girl as a parallel to the wine and bread Jesus offers His followers; however, while consuming the wolf’s offering might take the girl from wellness to sickness, Jesus’ offering does exactly the opposite. You can see the impact your story would have on someone raised as I was. Brothers Grimm, thank you for letting me go back in time and reminding me that my child, niece and nephew must also learn the moral of obedience taught by your tale, which of course I have already recommended to my brothers and sister, so they can reread it and find the amazing lessons that the Church and our parents were trying to give as in the form of a fairy tale. Sincerely, Jane Doe Jane Doe
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48 The Story of the Three Little Pigs England (1890) Once upon a time when pigs spoke rhyme And monkeys chewed tobacco, And hens took snuff to make them tough, And ducks went quack, quack, quack, O! There was an old sow with three little pigs, and as she had not enough to keep them, she sent them out to seek their fortune. The first that went off met a man with a bundle of straw, and said to him, "Please, man, give me that straw to build me a house." Which the man did, and the little pig built a house with it. Presently came along a wolf, and knocked at the door, and said, "Little pig, little pig, let me come in." To which the pig answered, "No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin chin." The wolf then answered to that, "Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in." So he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew his house in, and ate up the little pig. The second little pig met a man with a bundle of furze [sticks], and said, "Please, man, give me that furze to build a house." Which the man did, and the pig built his house. Then along came the wolf, and said, "Little pig, little pig, let me come in." "No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin chin." "Then I'll puff, and I'll huff, and I'll blow your house in." So he huffed, and he puffed, and he puffed, and he huffed, and at last he blew the house down, and he ate up the little pig. The third little pig met a man with a load of bricks, and said, "Please, man, give me those bricks to build a house with." So the man gave him the bricks, and he built his house with them. So the wolf came, as he did to the other little pigs, and said, "Little pig, little pig, let me come in." "No, no, by the hair of my chiny chin chin." "Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in." Well, he huffed, and he puffed, and he huffed and he puffed, and he puffed and huffed; but he could not get the house down. When he found that he could not, with all his huffing and puffing, blow the house down, he said, "Little pig, I know where there is a nice field of turnips."
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49 "Where?" said the little pig. "Oh, in Mr. Smith's home field, and if you will be ready tomorrow morning I will call for you, and we will go together and get some for dinner." "Very well," said the little pig, "I will be ready. What time do you mean to go?" "Oh, at six o'clock." Well, the little pig got up at five, and got the turnips before the wolf came (which he did about six) and who said, "Little pig, are you ready?" The little pig said, "Ready! I have been and come back again, and got a nice potful for dinner."
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