We then aimed to identify who within Australian organisations both private and

We then aimed to identify who within australian

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We then aimed to identify who within Australian organisations (both private and public) has responsibility for KM strategy implementation. The results shown in Figure 6 indicate that in most organisations there is no formal role for KM strategy implementation, as it is perceived to be ‘everyone’s responsibility’ (27%), or the respondents left this question unanswered (15%), which makes it 42% in total. Very few respondents assigned this role to the top management (CEO, CIO or even CKO). A question raised by this result is that of how organisa- tions motivate and involve their staff in KM strategy implementation if it is perceived as everybody’s job. Another question raised is that of what department or function would be responsible for monitoring this implementation if there is no formal role assigned to govern this process. It was interesting to note that approximately one in five organisations consider a specific department or function responsible for the implementation of a KM strategy (Executive group – 25%). These could partly comprise an answer to the above questions when the organisations recognise the need to set up a specific mechanism to ensure successful implementation of KM strategy, which could be similar to the KM governance framework proposed by Zyngier et al . (2004). We found that the respondent’s position had a positive affect on the answers to this question. There is a medium- strength correlation between the position of the CEO and the responsibility for implementation of a KM strategy given to the Director of HR. This indicates that CEOs believed that the Director of HR is responsible for the implementation of a KM strategy. There was a medium- strength correlation found between the position of the Manager of HR and a response of ‘No formal role for the implementation of a KM strategy’. This indicates that managers of HR believed that there is no formal role assigned for the implementation of a KM strategy. In this study, CEOs believed that they have the primary responsibility for the implementation of a KM strategy in their organisation. They also indicated that HR managers have the same responsibility for KM strategy implemen- tation as the CIO, CKO and specific departments or functions in the organisation. Such results demonstrate that a more coordinated approach to KM strategy implementation is certainly desirable, which requires stronger links and better communication of roles and responsibilities among all senior executives involved. What tasks are involved in KM strategy implementation? Finally, this research question looked at identifying the tasks involved in KM strategy implementation rather than the specific KM tools and techniques selected in the McKeen & Staples (2002) survey. The results in Figure 7 indicated that all respondents approved the importance of all five suggested tasks: ‘collect/gather knowledge’, ‘organise knowledge’, ‘use the knowledge’, ‘implement learning’ and ‘disseminate knowledge’.
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  • Spring '11
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  • Management, km strategy

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