She sat up and said I have these evil spirits that follow me here and tell me

She sat up and said i have these evil spirits that

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She sat up and said, “I have these evil spirits that follow me here and tell me not to trust you. I am fighting because in my heart I do trust that you care. I am scared to tell my husband or the doctor because I don’t want them to take my kids away”. After listening to her this had been going on for months, she had been suffering alone. Because she had trust in me I explained that acute psychiatric hospitalization was in order to adjust her medications and monitor the effects. I also explained that I would personally make sure she had parenting counseling classes included. She eventually agreed, we called her husband and the psychiatric to my office so as not to change the environment and we filled the papers and she was admitted. I saw her again two months later and she was very thankful and almost apologetic about her previous behavior. It was not about her taking the medications we ordered for her, or about her keeping all her scheduled appointments; it was about listening to her needs. “How can we as individual healthcare providers improve the art of listening to enhance positive Patient Centered Care goals?
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Reply | Quote & Reply Oct 21, 2015 10:40 PM 0 Like Substantive Post Rebecca Briggs 4 posts Re:Re:Topic 2 DQ 2 Hi Kim, I really like and appreciate your opening statement, “the diverse society that makes up the United States of America is a complex and beautiful medley of cultures and beliefs”.   In particular, I like and agree with the part about the diversity of America. My personal education for diversity came when I work in New York City large Trauma department. It was there that I felt  had the “United Nations” for patients. It seemed to me, every day I came to work I  would meet yet another culturally or linguistically  different patient. Not only did I feel challenged at times, but the patient in term had also stereotyped me as “just another  indifferent” healthcare provider unaware of their culture or bias against them. Some patients thought differently of me, of course,: to them I was their “maid”, to others, I was there legal  “pimp”, and others still,  I was their "baby-sitter",   providing pampers and formula for their infants. I did my best to bond with my patients when allowed and consequently learned a lot from them. Ironically, it was a very educated American lady who seemed to get my attention one busy morning. She  was cleared from any serious injuries after a MVC  (motor vehicle collision) and wanted to return to her  nieces home she had been visiting for a graduation.
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