The second approach is fairly spread out but two problems can be noted first

The second approach is fairly spread out but two

This preview shows page 230 - 232 out of 371 pages.

training session is performed to sum adaptations further. The second approach is fairly spread out, but two problems can be noted; first, there is seemingly way too much lag time between Monday and Friday, and perhaps not enough recovery time between Friday-Saturday. The good news is that we can still get great results if we make Monday a very hard session with a longer SRA curve and make Friday a very easy session with a very short SRA curve, or simply keep all of the days the same in difficulty and let functional overreaching take care of the asymmetries. But even functional overreaching has limits. If we look at the last training arrangement above, we will have a very tough time getting the most out of that sequence. If we train with an even difficulty in each session, our Wednesday session will have a very hard time meeting overload requirements because of the two consecutive fatiguing sessions that precede it. And because of the massive lag time between Wednesday and the next Monday session, we’re sure to start pushing up on the low frequency boundaries of optimal technical and hypertrophic frequencies. The recommendation we can thus derive here is that once we’ve decided on a training frequency, structuring our workouts in a manner that roughly spaces them out in an even manner is probably the best idea. In reality, most everyone discovers this within a few months or years of training, even if it’s the hard way. If you have heavy squats on Monday, heavy front squats on Tuesday, and heavy deadlifts and leg presses on Wednesday, you’ll quickly figure out that your “heavy” deadlifts are anything but, and that the only good workout you have all week is the squat workout.
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Chapter No. 6 Scientific Principles of Strength Training P 231 UNDER-APPLICATION OF SRA Under-application of the SRA principle is when a lifter designs or executes a program without being aware of (or aware enough) of the SRA principle. There are at least three notable examples of this sort of error. 1.) TOO HIGH OF A FREQUENCY FOR THE SITUATION High frequencies of training and especially of overload training are best for the development and solidification of technique and the stimulating of hypertrophy. When these are the preeminent goals, very high frequency programs are incredibly effective. Mostly, such goals and thus programs are best suited for beginner and intermediate lifters due to their need for technical work and hypertrophy. Smaller lifters and slower twitch lifters are also candidates for high frequency programs even if they are quite experienced and don’t intend on putting on much more muscle. So far so good, but the problem arises when high frequency programming is applied to all lifters across all levels of development, fiber type, strength, and size differences. The number of superheavyweight lifters that train very frequently is incredibly small, as is the number of very advanced lifters. These groups of people generate much longer SRA curves from their greater overload needs and thus need more time to recover, as well as training to focus much more on neural force production abilities than on muscle size or technique. High
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