That is the subject of the next chapter Suggested Questions What resources do

That is the subject of the next chapter suggested

This preview shows page 116 - 119 out of 219 pages.

because of their access to resources. That is the subject of the next chapter. Suggested Questions What resources do you depend on? How do you get them? What would happen if the stores in which we get our resources were to all close, how would you get needed resources? We are beginning to see consequences to climate change in our time. Can you name some of these consequences? Climate change has occurred in the past and has had consequences for historical societies. For example, early societies
110 Native Peoples of North America Chapter 3 in the Southwest experienced cultural changes and migration because of climate change. What might we experience in the future because of climate change? We all want to have good jobs in our future. What is a “good job”? What jobs have high status; what have low status? Why do some jobs have greater status than others? Diseases go through an evolutionary process, as do any other life forms. New diseases evolve, old diseases mutate. Can you think of any recent examples of this? The Mohawk leader Joseph Brant visited England several times in the seventeenth century. He was impressed by Britain’s military power, but shocked by the sight of people begging and living on the streets. Why do you think he was shocked? What would be the expectation about resources in a Native American society? How might factors like climate change and the need for new sources of energy effect the way humans get their resources in the future? Suggested Resources For more information about the role of women in pre-historic economies, see Woman the Gatherer , edited by Frances Dahlberg, which includes the article “Woman the Gatherer: Male Bias in Anthropology,” by Sally Slocum.
111 Native Peoples of North America Chapter 3 Peggy Sanday’s works previously sited are also good references for the role of women in economies. Richard White’s The Roots of Dependency offers excellent case studies of the economic flexibility of indigenous American societies and how those economies were undermined by European intrusion. Robert Jarvenpa’s Northern Passage illustrates how the contemporary Na Dine’h people attempt to maintain their economy within the larger political structure of Canada. While not about indigenous American societies per se, books by Jared Diamond, such as Collapse and Guns, Germs and Steel, offer insights into how and why indigenous societies in Africa, Asia, and the Americas were overwhelmed by European intrusions. The pre-historic societies of the southwestern part of the United States are good case studies for the consequences of climate change. In addition to the previously mentioned Life in a Pueblo by Kathy Kamp, I also recommend Those Who Came Before: Southwestern Archaeology in the National Park System, by Robert Lister and Florence Lister, and its companion video of the same title.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture