The research problem for this proposal is What are the factors that lead to

The research problem for this proposal is what are

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The research problem for this proposal is: What are the factors that lead to rejection of a new lung post-transplantation? Current Background There are many factors that can affect the outcome of lung transplantation. First is whether or not a patient is dependent on mechanical ventilation prior to the procedure. The Lung Allocation Score (LAS) of a patient indicates the level of medical urgency that is associated with having a lung transplantation surgery. A patient who is mechanically ventilated is determined to typically have a higher LAS compared to those who are non-mechanically ventilated. A research study of 411 patient subjects, both mechanically ventilated and non-mechanically ventilated, revealed that mechanically ventilated patients had a decreased risk of survival in the first 6- months following lung transplantation compared to those non-mechanically ventilated (Singer, et. al., 2011). Also, Cystic Fibrosis patients are susceptible to having many pre-transplant conditions due to their decreasing overall state of health. Three pre-transplant conditions, Body Mass Index (BMI), reduced bone mineral density, and diabetes, were evaluated in 92 lung transplant recipients. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has been defined as “a patient’s perception of illness-related effects on physical, psychological and social dimensions of their lives (Hoy, et. al.,
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CF AND LUNG TRANSPLANTATION 4 2012, p. 364).” Post-transplant, the only condition of the three studied that was concluded to have a negative effect on HRQOL was BMI, specifically BMIs that indicated the patient was overweight or obese (Hoy, et. al., 2012). Often patients with Cystic Fibrosis have frequent infections of the respiratory tract and lungs. A common lung infection in fibrocystic patients, Aspergillosis, can put patients at a high- risk status when considering lung transplantation. In patients, different reasons causing this high- risk status are dependent upon which parts of the body are infected by aspergillomas. With a very careful preparation to transplantation and a very detailed regimen of immunosuppressant treatments post-transplant, a patient who had bilateral pulmonary and sinus aspergillomas experienced a successful transplantation with no episodes of rejection (Minces, et. al., 2011). A common environmental fungus that can be found in various places indoor and outdoor, Aspergillus , is the type of fungus that leads to the infection known as Aspergillosis. There are many different types of Aspergillosis, all with varying degrees of detriment. This fungus can cause allergic and/or invasive infections in many different parts of the body, most commonly the respiratory tract and lungs (Definition of Aspergillosis, 2012). Many cystic fibrosis patients are infected throughout their lifetimes with Aspergillus fungal infections. A specific common fungal organism, Aspergillus fumigates (A. fumigatus), has been identified to be increasing in many CF patients in recent years. From 2001 to 2009, a study found that A. fumigatus in the sputum of Canadian CF patients rose a total of 10%. A trend has
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  • Winter '13
  • Rajapan
  • Qualitative Research, Lung transplantation

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