NOT QUITE FAIR The hills the meadows and the lakes Enchant not for their own

Not quite fair the hills the meadows and the lakes

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NOT QUITE FAIR The hills, the meadows, and the lakes, Enchant not for their own sweet sakes. They cannot know, they cannot care To know that they are thought so fair. E. PENTAMETER: Some quotations from Alexander Pope illustrate iambic pentameter. What oft was thought, but ne’er so well express’d. The bookful blockhead, ignorantly read, With loads of learned lumber in his head. F. HEXAMETER: (sometimes called an alexandrine ) If hunger, proverbs say, allures the wolf from wood, Much more the bird must dare a dash at something good. G. HEPTAMETER: The iambic heptameter example is from a poem by Ernest Thayer. CASEY AT THE BAT It looked extremely rocky for the Mudville nine that day, The score stood four to six with but an inning left to play:
H. OCTOMETER: Below is an example from a poem by E. A. Poe to illustrate trochaic octometer. THE RAVEN Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, VERSE FORMS : The kinds of verse forms based on meter and rhyme are (A) rhymed verse, (B) blank verse, and (C) free verse. A. RHYMED VERSE : Rhymed verse consists of verse with end rhyme and usually with a regular meter B. BLANK VERSE : Blank verse consists of lines of iambic pentameter without end rhyme. C. FREE VERSE : Free verse consists of lines that do not have a regular meter and do not contain rhyme. DEVICES OF SOUND A. RHYME : is the similarity of likeness of sound existing between two words. A true rhyme should consist of identical sounding syllables that are stressed and the letters preceding the vowels sounds should be different. Thus fun and run are TRUE or perfect rhymes because the vowel sounds are identical preceded by different consonants. Near, off, or slant rhyme: A rhyme based on an imperfect or incomplete correspondence of end syllable sounds. Common in the work of Emily Dickinson, for instance: It was not death, for I stood up, And all the dead lie down. It was not night, for all the bells Put out their tongues for noon. B. POSITION OF RHYME : Rhyme may be end rhyme or internal rhyme. 1. END RHYME : consists of the similarity occurring at the end of two or more lines of verse: I wish that my room had a FLOOR I don’t so much care for a DOOR But this walking AROUND Without touching the GROUND Is getting to be quite a BORE! 2. INTERNAL RHYME : consists of the similarity occurring between two or more words in the same line of verse. Once upon a midnight DREARY, while I pondered, weak and WEARY, C. KINDS OF RHYME : The kinds of rhyme based on the number of syllables presenting a similarity of sound are: 1. MASCULINE RHYME —occurs when one syllable of a word rhymes with another word: bend and send ; bright and light 2. FEMININE RHYME —occurs when the last two syllables of a word rhyme with another word: l awful and awful ; lighting and fighting 3. TRIPLE RHYME —occurs when the last three syllables of a word or line rhyme: v ictorious and glorious ; ascendency and descendency ; quivering and shivering ; battering and shattering D. RHYME SCHEME —is the pattern or sequence in which the rhyme occurs. The first sound is represented or designated as a

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