And visit this new deal timeline for the years from

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And visit this New Deal timeline for the years from 1932 to 1938. The policies developed during this time would attempt to bring relief to many struggling Americans, but they would also bring their own share of critics and controversies.
Key legislation enacted under the New Deal includes the National Labor Relations Act, the Social Security Act, the Gold Reserve Act, and the Securities Exchange Act. The following organizations were established at the time: the National Resources Planning Board, the Public Works Administration, the Civilian Conservation Corps, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the National Labor Board. The Social Security Program One of the key pieces of legislation passed as part of the New Deal was the Social Security Act. The Roosevelt administration drew from the words of the Constitution that the State should provide for people's "general welfare" as it created the Social Security Program, which took effect on August 15, 1935. The program deducted money from citizens' pay checks and used that money to provide for the welfare of retired workers, the physically disadvantaged, and dependent mothers. The Social Security Program is the most enduring legacy of the New Deal Era and the most representative of its philosophy. The Civilian Conservation Corps One of the biggest initiatives undertaken in Roosevelt's first term was the Civilian Conservation Corps, popularly known as the CCC. The CCC took effect March 31, 1933. Under this program, young men, typically ranging in age from 17 to 23, worked in government camps supervised by military personnel for projects that included flood control, reforestation, park maintenance, erosion control, structure building, and fire-fighting. Workers in the Corps were required to send home most of their pay, typically to their parents. As many as half a million young men were earning their living through this program by the year 1935. The benefits of the CCC were not just economic. By employing youth, the program ensured that most of them would not turn to crime, so tempting in harsh economic times. The nature of the projects themselves—mostly building and conservation projects—contained a certain inherent reward. And, by requiring that these young men send most of their pay home, the policy makers ensured that the money helped families in need. Finally, since most of the work was vocational in nature, it taught the Corps members vital life, work, and social skills —skills that would stand them in good stead in the future. For the population at large, the
hope was that the work of the Corps would increase their appreciation of nature's resources. Certainly, the CCC would prove to be among Roosevelt's most popular programs in that decade. Life in the CCC Camps Many workers for the Corps have been interviewed about their experiences with the CCC.

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