Van Buren believed that rather than being dangerous and divisive political

Van buren believed that rather than being dangerous

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Van Buren believed that rather than being dangerous and divisive, political parties were a necessary and desirable element of political life Party competition provided a check on those in power and offered voters a real choice in elections Parties helped counteract sectionalism by bringing together different regions in support of candidates National political parties, Van Buren realized, formed a bond of unity in a divided nation He tried to reconstruct Jeffersonian alliances between SOuthern planters and Northern republicans Adams despised political parties Vote for Jackson who can fight, not Quincy who can write Jackson won a resounding victory this time Section 4 Andrew Jackson was a champion of the common man who wanted Indians and blacks out of America He hated banks and paper money He believed that states should be the focal point of government activity and opposed federal efforts to shape the economy or interfere in individuals’ private lives Government posts should be open to common people, said Jackson
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Chapter 10 6 Jackson introduced the principle of rotation in office (called the spoils system) into national office, making loyalty to the party the main qualification for jobs like postmaster and customs official Large national conventions now chose candidates Jackson’s Kitchen Cabinet - informal group of advisors who helped write speechies and supervised communication between white house and local party officials - was largely made up of newspaper editors Jacksonian politics revolved around issues spawned by the market revolution and the continuing tension between national and sectional loyalties The central elements of political debate were the government’s stance towards banks, tariffs, currency, and internal improvements, and the balance of power between national and local authority Market revolution helped shape parties’ views Democrats were alarmed by the widening gap between social classes, and warned that non producers were seeking to use connection with government to enhance their wealth to the disadvantage of the producing class, and believed that the government should adopt a hands- off attitude towards the economy The democrats attracted aspiring entrepreneurs and farmers and city workers The Whigs united behind the American system, believing that vie a protective tariff, a national bank, and aid to internal improvements, the federal government could guide economic development They were strongest in Northeast, the most rapidly modernizing region of the country. Most established businessmen and bankers supported their program of government promoted economic growth, as did farmers near rivers, canals, and the Great Lakes Basically - North Urban: Whigs, Isolated/rural: Democrat Slaveholders supported Democrats, by southern planter supported Whigs Under Jackson, democracy expanded and power of national government waned Weak national authority was essential to states’ rights according to Democrats
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