Temptation to reduce culture to value is great

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Temptation to reduce culture to value is great! October 20, 2015 Bourdieu, “The Forms of Capital” “Capital, which, in it’s objectified forms, takes time to accumulate, and which, as a potential capacity to produce profits and to reproduce itself in identical or expanded form… (pg. 444) Economic capital “Immediately and directly convertible into money” (444) Property Command over economic resources (cash, assets) Cultural capital Cultural “know how” (Dr. Sowers) Forms of knowledge, skills, education, and advantages that a person has, which give them a higher status in society. Parents provide their children with cultural capital by transmitting the attitudes and knowledge needed to succeed in the current educational system. Sometimes convertible to economic capital (444) Education Social capital Resources based on group membership, relationships, networks of influence and support. Bourdieu described social capital as "the aggregate of the actual or potential resources which are linked to possession of a durable network of more or less institutionalized relationships of mutual acquaintance and recognition." Social obligations sometimes convertible to economic capital (444) Bourdieu, Embodied Cultural Capital Embodied state – physical “Long-lasting dispositions of the mind and body”(444)
Takes a long time to gain o Quote on pg.446 “This embodied capital…” Unconscious acquisition (446) Often linked to our primary agents of socialization Bourdieu, Objectified Cultural Capital Objectified state Cultural goods (444) or “material objects and media” (448) “Cultural capital in it’s objectified state presents itself with all the appearances of an autonomous… (449) Bourdieu, Institutionalized Cultural Capital Institutionalized state Academic qualifications as “certificates of cultural competence” Institutional recognition of cultural capital (449-450) Standardizes, makes conversion possible VALUE of diploma depends on? Bourdieu, Habitus Habitus? (pg.446 in “Forms of Capital, pg.28, 211 in “Artistic Taste”) Active, literal, unconscious Embodiment of cultural expectations for behavior and action Acquired as repetitive, everyday habitus We learn to embody expectations of what people want from us “Tastes” are not your own We don’t formally “learn” taste, but it is part of our habitus Our perceptions, appreciations, and appropriations of the world around us Bourdieu, Habitus, Class, and Gender Style vs. function Upper class o “Aesthetic disposition” – style over use Working class o “Economy of practice” – function and value Food Upper class o Health and taste Working class
o Functional task of eating leads to survival Gendered Tastes?

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