Public Speaking Reading Notes

Body paragraphs should have main points indicated by

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Body paragraphs should have main points indicated by roman numerals, sub-points indicated by capital letters, sub-sub-points indicated by lower case letter Always use full sentences in a working outline Check for subordination Include full information for evidence that you use to support a point – author, qualifications, source, date of publication Insert transitions when they will be spoken In outlining your introduction, outline your attention getter, thesis, connect with the audience, your credibility, and preview your main points In outlining your conclusion, outline the summary of your main points and your clincher Be sure to include your specific purpose and thesis Elements of speaking outline: Main points, sub-points, abbreviations, evidence, difficult words, and transitions Chapter 12: language and style Word choice or diction requires consideration of the audience, occasion, and the nature of the message being conveyed Explaining and demonstrating visual aids with technical terms can help you gain credibility with your audience Oral language is different from written language because oral language is more adaptive, less formal, and includes repetition Denotative meaning is the literal, dictionary definition of a word Connotative meaning is the association that comes along with a word Take care in using confusing words or jargon without explaining. Jargon is technical terms that is familiar to only people in the field in which the word deals
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Use concrete words, not abstract Use concise language to save time and avoid confusion Expressing ideas effectively: Repetition for emphasis Hypothetical examples for emphasis and clarification Personal anecdotes Vivid language Figurative language Choosing respectful and unbiased language: avoid biased language and stereotypes look for gender-neutral terms avoid saying stupid shit it’s that simple , Chapter 13: Delivering your speech delivery consists of the set of verbal and nonverbal skills used to present a speech reading from a manuscript is desired when you must read EXACTLY what is on the manuscript and the word choice is very important (delicate situation, recalls, public addresses) Memorizing from a manuscript can allow you more eye contact with your audience, and you can memorize you word choice. The downside to memorizing is that you can forget and your speech can come across as “canned” or “prepackaged” Speaking from an outline is preferred in most situations because it combines the best of both worlds and makes your speech more conversational In impromptu speaking, you think about the topic, your answer/view, and what reasons or facts you can use to support your points Vocal delivery skills: Volume, tone, rate of delivery, projection, articulation, pronunciation, pausing, verbal fillers/tics Nonverbal delivery skills: Eye contact, panning, gestures, physical movement, proxemics, appearance Chapter 14: Using presentation aids Why use presentation aids?
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