Conclusions you draw from your data must be presented

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Conclusions you draw from your data must be presented in a clear, concise manner. The interpretation of your results should include why the results were important and how they fit into the context of the project. Things may go wrong in lab; however, even if your results are questionable, it is still possible to write a good lab report. Begin by stating what should have happened, then discuss what actually happened and why the experiment went wrong. Never begin your discussion with what went wrong. It is important that you demonstrate that you understand both what should have happened and what might have gone wrong. Note also that there is a big difference between a null result and a failure to get results.Tables and figures (graphs are considered figures) introduced in your results section can be referenced in the discussion. You should reference data tables and figures with words using complete sentences. See details below about formatting tables and figures.ConclusionThe purpose of the Conclusion section is to summarize, but not repeat, the pertinent concepts discussed in the results and discussion section. This is where you relate your results and discussion to the ideas presented in the introduction. It is also important to connect your experiments to the overall project. For example, if the objective of the project was to synthesize a soluble calcium supplement, the conclusion is where you would indicate whether your experiment produced a calcium solution that could practically be used as a supplementThen make a concluding statement(s) and relate your conclusion to the ideas presented in the introduction. Note: Stating that “overall the experiment went well” or that “I learned how to use a piece of equipment” are not strong conclusions. The conclusion is not to be a lengthy discourse. One paragraph (about four to seven sentences) is the amount to be presented in conclusion.ReferencesAlways cite any literature and websites used in preparing your lab report. “Verbal Communications” may also be cited as such. The specific format used to cite references varies from journal to journal. You should always reference the lab manual. You may have others if you cite literature values or refer to your textbook for clarification of ideas.Generally, all citations include the author’s last name and first initial, an abbreviated form of the journal title, the volume number, the first page number of the article and the year published. In citing a scientific paper, the title need not be given. In citing a book, begin with the author’s name, followed by the title of the book, the publisher, where published and the specific edition.ExamplesN. E. Triggs, M. Zahedi, J. W. Nibler, P. A. DeBarber and J. J. Valentini, J. Chem. Phys., 96, 1822 (1992).

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