The second stage is viewed as acting in ones own best

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norms. The second stage is viewed as acting in one’s own best interest (Barger, 2000). The third and final stage indicates a comprehension of social affiliation in having compassion for others. In the first level, moral thinking people behave by being told what to do by another person of higher authority, and this is the socially acceptable norm. If they do not follow through with their authoritarian, they are punished for being disobedient. The second stage in the first level is characterized by a means of acting in one’s best interest (Barger, 2000). In the second level of moral development, the third stage, the person has to have the approval of others to be accepted. In the fourth stage of the second level a person facilitates to the laws and implements the obligations of responsibility (Barger, 2000). In the third level of moral development, the fifth stage, adults have an under value of social affiliation and a genuine interest in the welfare of others. Most adults will never reach this level of moral thinking (Barger, 2000). Kohlberg’s stage of moral development explains examples of how individuals can only move through one stage at a time. An individual cannot bounce from orientation of selfishness to the obligations of duty without going through the conventional stage. They can only come to a conception of moral reasoning, a stage above their own conception. According to Kohlberg, it was important to present them with ethical problems so they could have a higher development in morality, and encourage their reasonableness to develop a good direction. Kohlberg believed that moral development could and can be advocated through the established educational system (Barger, 2000). Limitations of Kohlberg's Theory
KOHLBERG'S THEORY OF MORAL DEVELOPMENT 4 Kohlberg's theory has several limitations. One is that justice is not the most important moral principle. Having the ability to care about others is just as important. Kohlberg has a bias in stating that males are higher in moral reasoning than females. He does not take into account how females are socialized to be compassionate. Females are nurturers, so their approach to an issue is through care and responsibility of others instead of justice. "This lack of

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