9 for the asc account see fn 1 for the alfredian

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 16 pages.

9For the ASCaccount, see fn. 1; for the ‘Alfredian annals’ attributed to Asser in the former British Library, Cotton MSS, Otho A XII, see Asser's Life of King Alfred. Together with the Annals of Saint Neots Erroneously Ascribed to Asser, ed. W. H. Stevenson (Oxford, 1904), pp. 2223, trans. S. Keynes and M. Lapidge, Alfred the Great: Asser's Life of Alfred and Other Contemporary Sources(1983), p. 76; for the Historia Regum‘part 1’ version of those annals, see Byrhtferth's Northumbrian Chronicle: An Edition and Translation of the Old English and Latin Annals, ed. and trans. C. Hart, Early Chronicles of England 2 (Lewiston NY, 2006), pp. 19699 (also Symeonis Monachi Opera Omnia, ed. T. Arnold, Rolls Series 75, 2 vols (188285), II, 7475); for the subsequent ‘part 2’ Historia Regumaccount, see Arnold, Opera Omnia, II, 10506; for the Annals of St Neots, see The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle : a Collaborative Edition / Vol.17, The Annals of St. Neots, with, Vita Prima Sancti Neoti, ed. D. Dumville and M. Lapidge (Cambridge, 1985), pp. 5354; for John of Worcester, see The Chronicle of John of Worcester / Vol. 2, The Annals from 450 to 1066[hereafterCJW, II], ed. and trans. R. R. Darlington, P. McGurk, and J. Bray, Oxford Medieval Texts (Oxford, 1995), pp. 28083; for Roger of Wendover, see Rogeri de Wendover Chronica : sive, Flores Historiarum [hereafter Wendover, Chronica], ed. H. O. Coxe, 5 vols, English Historical Society (184144), I, 29899; for Æthelweard, see Chronicon Æthelweardi / Chronicle of Æthelweard , ed. A. Campbell (1962), pp.3536 : iv.2. 10HSCclaims that Ælla and Osberht were brothers (HSC, 5051), but that is likely to be speculation on the part of the eleventh-century narrator (cf. ASCs.a. 867, which appears to distinguish their lineage). Some of the Latin translations of the ASC entry take the assertion that ‘both kings’ (þa cyningas begen) were killed to mean that Osberht had died at that battle along with Ælla. This is not an unreasonable reading, though is uncertain because of ASC’s earlier reference to the ‘casting out’ (aweorpan) of Osberht. The entry says that the survivors made peace with the Great Army. Two of the next three Northumbrian kings bear a name (i.e. the Ecgberhts) sharing a dithematic suffix with Osberht, strong evidence of kinship (see, for instance, C. Clark, 'Onomastics', in The Cambridge History of the English Language Volume 1: The Beginnings to 1066, ed. R. M. Hogg (Cambridge, 1992), p. 458, and references therein). Even though there is no suggestion that Osberht fought with the Vikings against Ælla, it still looks reasonably possible that Osberht’s kin benefited from the battle of York.
emerged a cycle of heroic tales centring on the alleged ancestors of several important Scandinavian dynasties, including Ivar ‘the Boneless’ (Britain and Ireland), Bjorn ‘Ironside’ (Sweden), and Sigurd ‘Snake-in-the-Eye’ (Denmark).

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture