When the fire alarm sounds or the fire emergency code

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Concepts of Database Management
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Chapter 9 / Exercise 1
Concepts of Database Management
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When the fire alarm sounds or the fire emergency code is announced, evacuate the area promptly. Remove or assist patients and others to safety. Take the nearest exit leading away from the fire. Exit doors and aisles should never be blocked. Use an approved fire extinguisher as needed to provide safe passage from the hazard area. Two types of fire extinguishers are most commonly used in health care institutions. One is a combination of classes A, B, and C (Type ABC), and the other is a combination of classes B and C
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Concepts of Database Management
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Chapter 9 / Exercise 1
Concepts of Database Management
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Expert Verified
(Type BC). Type BC fire extinguishers are usually preferred for clinical laboratory use. Fire extinguishers are defined as follows: Class A (water base)—for paper and wood fires Class B (foam or dry chemical)—for flammable liquids or gases Class C (foam or dry chemical)—for electrically based fires Class D (graphite or dry chemical)—for metal fires D. Electrical Hazards —(shocks, fires, burns) Electrical hazards may be lessened by using hospital-grad electrical plugs with appropriate grounding and by eliminating the use of extension cords and gang-plugs. Defective equipment (i.e., that which produces a “tingling sensation” (shock) when handled) should be unplugged immediately and labeled for maintenance (contaminated parts should be disinfected before sending out for repairs or having repair personnel come into the lab). Electrical outlets and lab equipment should be checked regularly and repaired or replaced as needed. Written verification of equipment maintenance and voltage checks should be maintained for certifying / accrediting agencies, for example, CAP (College of American Pathologists), AABB (American Association of Blood Banks), and JCAHO (Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations). E. Radioactive Hazards For many clinical laboratories, radiation exposure levels are far less than required by state and federal regulators. When radionuclides are used or stored, the areas and the containers must be labeled with the radiation symbol. BARRIER EQUIPMENT V. Barrier Protection A. Engineering controls are measures taken in the laboratory environment or equipment that help to eliminate or minimize exposure to laboratory hazards. These controls are the first line of defense against biological and chemical agents . Examples of engineering controls are: 1) good ventilation, with regulated hourly air exchanges; 2) biological safety cabinets, for working aerosol producing or highly infectious specimens; and 3) fume hoods, for mixing and pouring chemicals. Ventilation systems and hoods must be periodically checked and certified to ensure proper
function. It is the responsibility of laboratory administration to implement and maintain engineering controls. B. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) worn by the laboratory worker acts as a barrier between the worker and workplace hazards. PPE should not be regarded as a primary barrier—rather, it is supplemental to engineering controls. Gloves, gowns, and lab coats, masks, goggles, and face shields are all examples of PPE. Protective equipment should be provided and maintained by the employer.

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