Every hit might not cause an injury and every injury might not be noticeable If

Every hit might not cause an injury and every injury

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Every hit might not cause an injury and every injury might not be noticeable. If the player gets up in a standard amount of time and seems fine after a hard hit, he continues to play. Pasinski believes, “Shots to the head that don’t necessarily cause obvious symptoms lead coaches and trainers to assume, mistakenly, that a player is fine to get back in the game. And sometimes athletes keep quiet about this type of injury because they want to keep playing.” (Pasinski, Marie). Small hits to the head might not have immediate effects, but every hit to the head does have an effect. The brain is a fragile part of our body and has to be taken care of with caution. Just because every hit doesn’t show clear symptoms doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be treated with care. Every blow to the head should require a certain procedure and be looked at. The player should not be
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3 Virani able to re enter the game unless a doctor who specializes in head injuries has cleared him. This is the best way to keep the players safe. Players shouldn’t be keeping themselves in the game after hits to the head for their own safety. Officials should require the players to get checked after a big hit regardless of how they feel. “There is still a pervasive belief that only a concussion serious enough to knock the athlete out will do damage, but that’s not the case,” Pasinski said. There have been reports that state multiple blows to the head over time add up even if they’re small hits. Once again, every hit causes damage. “Particularly detrimental is a condition known as second impact syndrome where the player sustains an additional head injury before recovering from the first. The first blow may throw off the athlete’s coordination and reaction time, increasing the risk and severity of additional hits. As an example of this, Levine referenced Zackery Lystedt, a Washington State middle school football player who suffered permanent brain damage after sustaining a concussion and returning to play.” (Neporent, Liz). This is the main
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  • Winter '08
  • Bill
  • Traumatic brain injury, American football, players

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