Present the information in a brief and digestible format Make the product

Present the information in a brief and digestible

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- Present the information in a brief and digestible format. - Make the product visually attractive, with multimedia functions (visuals, links). Businesses (in-company and external) Staff from businesses are, of course, specifically interested in the business case. Sharing your case study with businesses may be useful in inspiring them, informing them about the added value you are creating, and possibly persuading them to become involved in similar IAB initiatives. Collaborative IAB initiatives: business, NGO, public sector Other parties involved in IAB initiatives may be eager to learn from your inclusive business experiences. They are likely to be interested in those lessons learnt which they might also apply. Case study creators may want to inspire and motivate this audience. Investing actors funding inclusive pilots or other types of innovation These actors will want to know whether their investment was worthwhile. Their focus may be on objectives, key milestones, or results. Case study creators would like to inform this audience or persuade them to scale pilots. Researchers Researchers are interested in case studies in order to reflect on them, and to identify knowledge gaps that may need to be addressed with (action-) research. Case study creators may wish to share their studies with this group to foster collaboration and validate findings. Table 1: Examples of intended audiences of case studies and their respective uses
GET THE IDEA GET THE PICTURE GET THE DETAILS Case study raw material Desk research AEIOU Photo* Interview Video Observations Docs Scanning 1-2 min Headings, overviews Photo & (info)graphic Browsing 5-10 min Texts Photo essays (AEIOU) Infographics Interviews Short video Longer interviews/video’s Interview transcripts Deeper analysis Research data Links to external documents Links to source materials * See page 19 7 Figure 1: Information layering Information design Different audiences have different needs and attention spans. Some will want a quick impression that helps them assess whether the study is worth their time, whereas others might want to dig into the details. Figure 1 differentiates between three levels of information: getting the idea, getting the picture, and getting the detail. This idea of information layering informs the design of the final product in such a way that it can cater to multiple uses on the basis of the same raw case study materials (interviews, observations, data sources, and video and photo material). 2. The case study approach
8 Contents of the case study Structure The following generic structure (see Table 2) ensures that all necessary information needed to make the case study robust and relevant is included. Material (such as online data, first person narratives, visuals, and analysis) will be collected on each topic during the case study process.

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