232670332-IB-Psychology-Abnormal-and-Human-Relationships-Options-Studies-Sheet.docx

Cultural ballanger et al 2001 variations culturally

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Cultural Ballanger et al (2001) – variations culturally don’t reflect social/medical reality  factors of diagnosis, lack of appropriate instruments. Culture bound syndromes – Zhang et al (1998) – 16 of 20,000 reported mood disorder. Tseng and Hsu (1970) – Chinese concerned with body  manifest neurasthenic symptoms similar to physical depression Kleinmen (1982) – Similar to depression in DSM-III. 87% classifiable as depressed. Mood only given 9% cases. Somatic. Cultural Bias Beck (1982) – minority group shows same symptoms as white  same disorder, may not be true. Describe symptoms and prevalence (depression & bulimia) Depression Poongothai et al (2009) – Chennai South India, 15.9 prevalence. Patient Health Questionnaire. Depressed mood (30.8%), fatigue (30%), suicidal thoughts (12%) Weisman et al (1996) – 19% Beirut, 1.5% Taiwan Levav (1997) – increase in Jewish males
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Bulimia Drewnowski et al (1988) – telephone survey, USA studets. 1% women, 0.2% men. 2.2% undergrad women on campus. Keel & Klump (2003) – meta analysis. Increase 1970-1993 Analyse etiologies of depression & bulimia Depression Hammen (1997) – 4 biological reasons – families, meds start/stop, physical symptoms. Hagen et al (2004) – evolutionary perspective – to signal need and elicit help Genetics – Sullivan et al (2000) – meta-analysis. 21,000 twins. MZ 2x likely if co-twin had disorder. Genetic influence 31-42% Neurobiological – Rampello et al (2000) – imbalance of noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine Lacasse & Leo (2005) – no finite evidence neurotransmitter role Cognitive – Ellis (1962) – cognitive style theory (psychological disturbances from irrational thinking  false conclusions) Beck (1976) – negative triad Cognitive Distortion Theory Boury et al (2001) – correlation negative automatic thought & depression severity. Sociocultural – Brown & Harris (1978) – Life Events & Difficulties Scale. 82% depressed recently experience sever life event. Vulnerability model. Bulimia Genetics –
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Kendler et al (1991) – twins - increase incidence in families. 2163 twins. 23% concordance MZ, 9% DZ Cognitive – Perceptual Distortions - Fallon and Rozin (1985) – shown images, indicate own shape, ideal figure, most attractive opposite sex. Cognitive Disinhibition – Polivy and Herman (1985) – dieters/non dieters taste test. Milkshake. Icecream. Dieters ate more. Sociocultural – Jaeger et al (2002) – 1750 med/nursing students. 10 silhouettes, BMI, dieting. Sig dissatisfaction northern Mediterranean, European. Non western = lowest. Role of media Discuss cultural/gender variations in prevalence Depression GENDER Nolen Hoeksema (2001) – women 2x likely men, little support women more depressed only because of sex hormones, women have less power/status (sociocultural)/ role strain hypothesis CULTURE Weissman et al (1996) – depression v bipolar in 10 countries.
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  • Winter '15
  • james huss
  • Major depressive disorder, Social exchange theory, prosocial behaviour

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