Many of these oversights were first pointed out by Roger Daniels in Westerners

Many of these oversights were first pointed out by

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Many of these oversights were first pointed out by Roger Daniels in "Westerners from the East: Oriental Immigrants Reappraised," Pacific Historical Review, 35 (1966) and "No Lamps Were Lit for Them," pp. 3-18. 35. Donna Gabaccia. "Is Everywhere Nowhere?" pp. 1115-1135; George Sanchez, "Race, Nation, and Culture," pp. 66-84. This content downloaded from 146.111.34.148 on Mon, 21 Jan 2019 18:45:18 UTC All use subject to
60 Journal of American Ethnic History / Spring 2002 36. "Shut the Gates to the Hindu Invasion," San Francisco Examiner, 16 June 1910; "The Watchdog States," San Francisco Post, 24 May 1910. 37. San Francisco Bulletin, 4 May 1891, as cited in Roger Daniels, Asian America, p. 111. "Proceedings of the Asiatic Exclusion League," July, 1911 (Allied Printing, San Francisco, 1911). 38. Roger Daniels, The Politics of Prejudice: The Anti-Japanese Movement in California and the Struggle for Japanese Exclusion (Berkeley, Calif., 1962), p. 20. 39. Sucheng Chan, Asian Americans?an Interpretive History (Boston, 1991), p. 44. 40. "Advance Guard of Hindu Horde Has Arrived," San Francisco Examiner, 1 August 1910, as cited in Lucy Salyer, Laws Harsh as Tigers, p. 127. 41. San Francisco Daily News, 20 September 1910. 42. George Sanchez writes that "Mexicans rapidly replaced the Japanese as a major component of the agricultural labor force." George Sanchez, Becoming Mexi can American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945 (New York, 1993), p. 19. 43. Mae Ngai, "The Architecture of Race," p. 91. 44. Abraham Hoffman, Unwanted Mexican Americans in the Great Depression: Repatriation Pressures, 1929-1939 (Tuscon, Ariz., 1974), p. 10. 45. Neil Foley, The White Scourge: Mexicans, Blacks, and Poor Whites in Texas Cotton Culture (Berkeley, Calif., 1997), p. 54. 46. Frederick Russell Burnham, "The Howl for Cheap Mexican Labor," in The Alien in Our Midst or Selling Our Birthright for a Mess of Pottage, ed. Madison Grant and Charles Stewart Davison (New York, 1930), p. 48. See also Neil Foley, White Scourge, p. 51. 47. V. S. McClatchy, "Oriental Immigration"; Neil Foley, White Scourge, pp. 195, 197. 48. Foley, The White Scourge, p. 55. 49. Chester H. Rowell, "Why Make Mexico an Exception?" Survey, 1 May 1931; and idem, "Chinese and Japanese Immigrants," Annals of the American Acad emy, 34 (September, 1909): 4; as cited in Foley, The White Scourge, p. 53. 50. Frederick Russell Burnham, "The Howl for Cheap Mexican Labor," p. 45. 51. Ibid., p. 48 52. John Higham, Strangers in the Land, pp. 132-3. 53. Donna Gabaccia, "The Yellow Peril' and the 'Chinese of Europe,'" pp. 177-9. 54. Massachusetts Bureau of Statistics of Labor, Twelfth Annual Report of the Bureau of Statistics of Labor (Boston, 1881), pp. 469-70. My thanks to Florence Mae Waldron for this citation. 55. Lodge was quoting the U.S. Consul in Budapest. Henry Cabot Lodge, "The Restriction of Immigration," North American Review, 152 (1891): 30-32, 35; Mat thew Frye Jacobson, Barbarian Virtues, pp. 76-7. 56. Lothrop Stoddard, "The Permanent Menace from Europe," in The Alien in Our Midst, ed. Grant and Davison, pp. 227-8.

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