His killing of mary is not a frenzied act of violence

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taking advantage of their daughter. His killing of Mary is not a frenzied act of violence created out of hatred for white people, but rather a killing of the romantic side of Bigger who dreams of things he cannot have.
Butler then points out that throughout the novel when Bigger feels the pressures of the white world too heavy on him he turns to Bessie. Bessie becomes a place of relief from those pressures for Bigger and the only person he feels he can be his natural self around. Butler says that although Bigger longs for his natural state, he also hates it. He points out that Bigger’s murder of Bessie and his justification of the murder are completely useless to Bigger’s escape from the law: the police are already searching for Bigger and Bessie’s body leads them to him. Butler also says that the night Bigger and Bessie start their escape and hideout that Bigger makes himself like Bessie: he drinks the whiskey in her purse until he is in the stupor he so often knows Bessie to be in. When Bessie realizes the danger she has put herself in by being a part of Bigger’s plot and escape and voices the stupidity and naivety she feels and in doing so, she lists the

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