Instead of flying through the sentence as one would

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Instead of flying through the sentence, as one would do if it were simply written in a linear way across the page, the reader tends to stop at each line-break and at every stanza break to contemplate how each stanza is different. And there is a difference. The first stanza is abstract, calling upon the reader to agree to the notion that something dependson something. But the word is not "on"; it is "upon." The formality of the word "upon" declares that this is important, that our attention is called to what the poet (and the reader) is about to perceive and understand. Instead of some formal or momentous event, though, the poet asks us to consider, in the second stanza, "a red wheel / barrow," a barnyard device of convenience. The indefinite article, "a," does not exactly make thisred wheelbarrow generic, but like the "upon," the article allows for a hint of transcendence: this is not just thewheelbarrow, any old piece of yard or barnyard machinery; it's awheelbarrow that can stand for something beyond itself. The break that comes between "wheel" and "barrow" causes us to consider the nature of this tool, its barrow-ness and the primitive wheelat its fulcrum. Also, the brevity of the lines calls attention to the weight of a singular word — like "red." The color is a word that we could normally skip over or barely notice, except that the next stanza turns that color into something else. The red has been "glazedwith rain / water." The word
Liquori 3"glazed" suggests something cold, hard, enamelled. Although the color red is usually regarded asa warm color, it has been made cool, if not cold, here. The effect of the "rain / water" (the word

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