When bratz dolls hit the market mattel initiated an

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When Bratz dolls hit the market, Mattel initiated an investigation against their former employee Carter Bryant and MGA following the production of Bratz (p. 378). The purpose of the investigation was to determine whether or not Bryant was employed by
Mattel while he designed Bratz dolls (p. 378). Although Mattel was presented with a victory and $100 million in damages by the lower courts in 2008, the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the ruling in 2010 (p. 378). In 2011, Mattel’s claims of ownership regarding the idea of Bratz were rejected by a federal jury in California (p. 378). Further, it was ruled that Mattel was responsible for stealing trade secrets belonging to MGA (p. 378). The overall cultural change in the lives of children has had a negative effect on other parts of Mattel’s product portfolio as well (Ferrell and Hartline, 2014, p. 378). As the lifestyles of American youth continue to change and technology continues to advance, all of Mattel’s products face marketing threats (p. 378). The rate at which children grow up and leave toys continues to increase (p. 378). Children of ages that were once interested in traditional toys are more interested in smart phones, gaming systems, social media and other electronic devices today (p, 378). The fact that children are more involved in extracurricular activities today than they have been in the past also poses as a threat to Mattel (p. 378). This is because children increasingly have less time for traditional toys (p. 378). Revenues have been steadily declining in the traditional toy segment of the play industry for several decades now (Gottlieb, 2013, p. 150). Less free time and other forms of play have a major impact on the loss of toy play time (p. 150). When compared to previous generations, today’s children have significantly less free time in their lives (p. 150). Less free time is one indicator of the continuing decline of traditional toys (p. 150). Alternative forms of play are another indicator for the decline (p. 150). There are so many forms of digital play on the market today that traditional toys are in competition with (p. 150). Children today are more engaged with iPads, computers, and other devices with screens than they are with traditional toys (p. 150). Simply stated, today’s children have decreased time and increased play choices (p. 150). References: Ferrell, O. C., & Hartline, M. D. (2014). Marketing Strategy: Text and Cases (6th ed.). Mason, OH: SouthWestern/Cengage Learning. Gottlieb, R. (2013). Time and Toys. Gifts & Decorative Accessories, 114(3), 150. Talbot, M. (2006). LITTLE HOTTIES. New Yorker, 82(40), 74-83.

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