The period produced several of the most well known

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9.List the Cultural Exchange and Diversitythat took place during the Enlightenment. (See page 4.15).10.The rise of capitalism facilitated the exchange of ideas and cultural practices, which intellectuals used in shaping their philosophies.11.Enlightenment thinking emphasized the role that individualized thought could play in crossing all racial and religious lines.12.Many Enlightenment thinkers rejected the tradition of slavery, looking to reason and individualized thought.13.Slave narratives were published during this time, enriching the Enlightenment philosophies with a new viewpoint and experience.14.The music of the time period was also diversified by the popularization of spirituals, or slave songs, which often featured religious themes and even hidden messages meant only for fellow slaves.15. Explain the ways the Enlightenment is influential in Contemporary Life. (See page 4.16).16.The views of Enlightenment thinkers and writers have impacted our modern philosophy, particularly in the realm of politics.17.Political satire, which was popularized by Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, has continued to this day in the form of political cartoons and television shows that poke fun at various aspects of government.18.Contemporary society places great emphasis on an individual's education, which parallels theEnlightenment view that the pursuit of knowledge was a form of moral progress.Module 5: The Romantic Period1.Identify, define, and explain the importance of each of the Major Themesof the Romantic period. (See page 5.05, particularly the blue tabs on the page.)2.Nationalism*: Due to key events like European colonialism, the French Revolution, and the establishment of the United States, many Western countries sought to distinguish
their identities, leading Romantic artists to express their national identities with pride through their works.3.Exoticism*: As cross-continental transportation became easier and colonialism became more widespread, Europeans became more exposed to nonwestern cultures that fascinated them. Exoticism was the artistic expression of that fascination, though often Europeans misrepresented the foreign and suppressed cultures they enjoyed.4.Revolution*: Romantics generally supported revolution against tradition, political reform that would grant rights to oppressed groups and equality for all.5.Heroism:The Byronic hero*, or Romantic hero, was the embodiment of the revolutionary thought and introspective concerns that Romantics faced in this era. Such

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