To do the morally wrong thing socrates insists that

This preview shows page 7 - 10 out of 11 pages.

to do the morally wrong thing. Socrates insists that it is better to live a private life, because you are being truthful and not giving in to the pressures of society. Socrates states, “Throughout my life, in any public activity I may have engaged in, I am the same man as I am in private life”(33b). II) i. Socrates points out that if he truly was corrupting people, than those people should have came forward and offered themselves as witnesses. But, none of his students come forward and admit that Socrates corrupted them. Instead, Socrates lists the people who attended the trial to support him, “I see many of these present here, first Crito, the father of Critoboulos here, also the Antiphon the Cephisian, the father of Epigenes”(33e). He Cholagh 7
points out his support group to show the jury that there are a lot of people who believe in him, trust his wisdom and support his actions. II) j. Socrates refuses to be angry, resentful, and cry in front of the jury. He does not want to beg the jury to acquit him of his chargers. Socrates is refusing to do these actions to, “Regard my reputation and yours and that of the whole city, it does not seem right to me to do these things, especially at my age and with my reputation”(35a). He believes it would be a disgrace for someone so highly acknowledged to act in such a pitiful way during trial. Socrates also refuses to do so because he is at an age where it would not be respectful or admired to act in such a way. He does not want to leave this earth begging the jury, but gracing the city of Athens with honor. III). Socrates states that he was never interested in materialistic possessions or living a life of deception, his only interest was living a life of wisdom. Therefore, he believes that he deserves a reward rather than a punishment. By dissuading his fellow citizens from pursuing personal ambitions and urging them instead toward mental and moral perfection, Socrates concludes that he deserves free meals in the Prtytaneum. Socrates suggests this penalty to show the jury that he does not believe that he should be punished for helping the people of Athens. Since he is incapable of intentionally wronging anyone, he can hardly intentionally wrong himself by proposing an unjust penalty. IV) a. Socrates states that the most difficult thing to do is avoid wickedness. He alleges his accusers of not avoiding wickedness. The accusers have not avoided wickedness, Cholagh 8
because they are so quick to judge an innocent and trustworthy man like Socrates. Socrates believes that if he were to ever leave the city of Athens; the hardest thing to do would be to stop talking. Socrates would refuse to choose a life of silence because he would not be able to discuss virtue and wisdom everyday. He believes that a life without conversing and questioning others is an unworthy life.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture