10 Russia and China are two of North Koreas biggest trade partners with China

10 russia and china are two of north koreas biggest

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10). Russia and China are two of North Koreas biggest trade partners with China accounting for nearly 85% of North Korea’s imports, and 83% of exports and Russia accounting for 2.3% of imports (Kessel 2017). This places a particular importance on these international players if the sanctions against North Korea are to be successful. The reason being, that China and Russia (more so China) maintain and provide the majority of North Korea’s trade economy they become vital in implementing and pressuring North Korea through the UNSC sanctions. Nuclear proliferation, in the context of North Korea is the tie that binds the underlying social issues each side fights for. II History and Current Policies In order to understand the current atmosphere that surrounds the controversy of North Korea’s nuclear program the complicated history must be examined. To bring about a coherent understanding of said history, one must look at nearly five decades of events and actions that follow or precede policy. For the sake of organization, this paper will follow a format of setting up and explaining an event or an action that is the cause or the result of a piece of policy being made. The first piece of policy we will look at is the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). As explained by United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs, The NPT serves as “landmark international treaty” that was put into the global sphere for multiple reasons. Those being, to thwart the proliferation of nuclear weapons and subsequent nuclear weapons technology, to bolster international cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and to advance the goal of “achieving nuclear disarmament and general and complete Laufer 7
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disarmament” (NPT 1968). Though North Korea signed the treaty in 1985, the country never came into true acquiescence with the treaty. By 2003, the nation withdrew from the agreement citing that withdrawal freed the country from restrictive agreements with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (UNODA 1). These agreements came in the form of allowing inspectors of the IAEA to examine nuclear material and facilitates and North Korea rejected those agreements, ending their participation in the NPT. So, in short the policy Safeguards that were in accordance with the previously signed treaty caused North Korea to withdrawal their acquiescence from non-proliferation of nuclear technologies. The next action/result (event/cause) of note occurred on October 9 th 2006. This marks the date of North Korea’s first nuclear test. The blast was so small, that some people believed that the country was bluffing. However, the speculation was put to an end when air samples were tested after the explosion (Collins 1). To compare, the U.S.’s 1945 trinity test “had a yield of about 20 kilotons, while North Korea’s first test “clustered around half a kiloton” (Collins 1). Though the test proved to be below average, it non-the-less resulted in the unanimous adoption of United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1718. The
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