Now just as we could disable and re enable a network

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Now just as we could disable and re-enable a network interface on Windows using ipconfig we can do a similar thing with the ifconfig command on Linux but the two commands you use are related to ifconfig but they instead are ifdown to take the interface down and ifup to bring the interface back online. For example if we wanted to take down the ENS32 interface I would type 'ifdown EFS32', hit Enter. Oops, I typed it wrong. And now if I type the ifconfig command we see that ENS32 is gone, it's not even listed the only interface we have currently running is our virtual loopback adapter. To bring that interface back online I type 'ifup' followed by the name of the interface, ENS32. Wait just a minute while the interface comes back online. Alright and you'll notice there's a little bit of an error listed here. We don't actually have to worry about it, one of the things about working with Linux is that the programmers who write these utilitieslove to display error messages on the screen whether they're really actually serious or not this is actually not a serious error message. In fact, if we were to type ifconfig again we should see that the ENS32 interface is back online and that it has an IP address assigned to it along with a subnet maskand everything is working great. Summary 12:50-13:02 That's it for this demonstration. In this demo, we talked about how to use command line tools to monitor network interface statistics. We first looked at the ipconfig command on Windows and then we looked at the ifconfig, ifdown, and ifup commands on Linux. Using ping and tracert 0:00-0:12 In this demonstration, we're going to spend some time working with two very useful network troubleshooting utilities. We're first going to look at the ping command and then we're going to look at the traceroute command. ping Command 0:13-6:31 Let's begin by looking at ping. Now ping is run from the command prompt. So I'm going to open up a command prompt session here. The way you use ping is you type 'ping' followed by either the IP address or the DNS name of the host that you want to test communications with. And that's what the purpose of the ping command is. It establishes that this system here can communicate over the network with the remote system that you specify. This tells us first of all that the IP configuration on this system and the remote system are both configured correctly and it also tells us that we have physical connectivity between this system and the remote system. Now to work, what ping does is send an ICMP echo request packet to the remote system and if that remote system receives that packet it responds with an ICMP echo response. And by doing this we can measure a lot of things, first of all whether the packets make it at all, and then if they do how long did it take for them to make the round trip. Let's try using the ping command to ping another host on this network. Let's ping 10.0.0.3 and press Enter. Now on Windows the ping command will send four ping packets and then it will exit. But be aware that if you run this same command ping on a Linux system it will ping continuously, it won't stop until you manually tell it to do so.
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