B the expected return depends on the expected rate of

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
b. The expected return depends on the expected rate of inflation over the next year. If the expected rate of inflation is less than 3.5% then the conventional CD offers a higher real return than the Inflation-Plus CD; if the expected rate of inflation is greater than 3.5%, then the opposite is true.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5-2 c. If you expect the rate of inflation to be 3% over the next year, then the conventional CD offers you an expected real rate of return of 4%, which is 0.5% higher than the real rate on the inflation-protected CD. But unless you know that inflation will be 3% with certainty, the conventional CD is also riskier. The question of which is the better investment then depends on your attitude towards risk versus return. You might choose to diversify and invest part of your funds in each. d. No. We cannot assume that the entire difference between the risk-free nominal rate (on conventional CDs) of 7% and the real risk-free rate (on inflation-protected CDs) of 3.5% is the expected rate of inflation. Part of the difference is probably a risk premium associated with the uncertainty surrounding the real rate of return on the conventional CDs. This implies that the expected rate of inflation is less than 3.5% per year. 4. E(r) = [0.35 × 44.5%] + [0.30 × 14.0%] + [0.35 × (–16.5%)] = 14% σ 2 = [0.35 × (44.5 – 14) 2 ] + [0.30 × (14 – 14) 2 ] + [0.35 × (–16.5 – 14) 2 ] = 630 σ = 25.52% The mean is unchanged, but the standard deviation has increased, as the probabilities of the high and low returns have increased. 5. Probability distribution of price and one-year holding period return for a 30-year U.S. Treasury bond (which will have 29 years to maturity at year’s end): Economy Probability YTM Price Capital Gain Coupon Interest HPR Boom 0.20 11.0% $ 74.05 $25.95 $8.00 17.95% Normal Growth 0.50 8.0% $100.00 $ 0.00 $8.00 8.00% Recession 0.30 7.0% $112.28 $12.28 $8.00 20.28% 6. From Table 5.3, the average risk premium for large-capitalization U.S. stocks for the period 1926-2005 was: (12.15%
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 5

b The expected return depends on the expected rate of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online