If most but not all males located near the center of

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61) If most, but not all , males located near the center of the lek had brighter-than-average red tails, and among all centrally located males females mated randomly, then the bright red tail probably evolved due to: A) Intersexual selection B) Intrasexual selection C) Good genes model of sexual selection D) Sexy sons model of sexual selection E) Material benefits model of sexual selection 62) If males with brighter-than-average red tails were randomly distributed in the lek, but these males had greater than average mating success, then the evolution of bright red tails could potentially be due to: 63) If males with brighter than average red tails i) were randomly distributed in the lek, ii) had greater than average mating success, and iii) sired offspring that had higher survival, then bright red tails would best be explained by: 64) Suppose that males with brighter-than-average red tails were randomly distributed in the lek, but only these males with brighter red tails were able to attract mates when located on the periphery of the lek –a location that makes females far more susceptible to predation when mating. In this case the evolution of the bright red tail is best explained by: 65) Suppose that on average a male grouse gets two matings per lifetime. If a mutation occurred that caused a male grouse to not display to females on the lek, but instead caused him to help one of his brothers during competition with other males to secure a centrally located display position on the lek. If this phenotype caused the brother to gain one extra mating, on average, then: A) The mutation will be favored by Darwinian selection B) The mutation will be favored by kin-selection C) The mutation will NOT be favored by kin selection D) The mutation is expected to increase in frequency across generations E) Answers A & B are both correct
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Use the following information for the next 10 questions (until you see a solid line): The common fruit fly is highly promiscuous and mates as often as once a day during a lifespan that may extend over several weeks. When males inseminate females they transfer sperm and about 80 types of seminal fluid proteins. This process also mechanically transfer some pathogenic bacteria from the male’s exterior to the interior of the female’s reproductive tract. Consider two hypothetical seminal fluid proteins and their receptors in the common fruit fly.
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