This is in turn due to a humans instinct to

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wearing a seatbelt. This is in turn due to a human’s instinct to compensate for the decrease in risk when wearing a seatbelt. When it comes to finding a solution to this issue, the answer cannot always be a clear and simple action. Things such as only using a seatbelt when necessary is not practical when it comes to driving a vehicle, so instead, the issue can be approached by making drivers aware of this. Car companies can make it aware to the public the increased risk when wearing seatbelts. This can be done be trying to implement a system that alarms you when you’re driving is becoming reckless. This can be compared to the same alarm that goes off when a driver does not have a seatbelt on. This could be triggered by sudden stops, sudden accelerations, or even include a GPS system that can gather data such as the current speed limit in the area to warn the driver of their risky driving. By making the driver aware, this could lead to less accidents related to risk compensation. Although this system would not be perfect in today’s world of technology and the inaccuracies that come with current GPS systems, this could be an application of Gamble and Walker’s findings in the near future. One more situation that Gamble and Walker’s experiments is
when wearing a bicycle helmet. The argument of this example is that does wearing a bicycle helmet actually increase or decrease a child’s safety? This study came to the conclusion that although this does not mean bike helmets are useless, it just means that they are causing additional harm that the helmet is not equipped to protect against. A way to fight against this, especially when it comes to teaching a child how to ride a bike, is to teach the child from the beginning the dangers riding a bike can have without purposely terrifying them since you want them to still be able to approach this task. With and without a helmet one can still end up hurting themselves greatly, and children need to be aware of this. A second approach could be letting them drive a short safe distance without protective gear and have them note their fear and insecurity; this lets them see what they should truly be feeling with or without the helmet to try to reduce their chances of risk compensation. Although these two methods might not be flawless, they might have a chance of impacting a child’s safety and awareness of their risk-taking behaviors in order to try to reduce them. Work Cited Gamble, T. & Walker, I. (2016). Wearing a bicycle helmet can increase risk-taking and sensation seeking in adults. Psychological Science, 27, 289-294. Janssen, W. (1994). Seat-belt wearing and driving behavior: An instrumented-vehicle study, Accident Analysis & Prevention,Volume 26,
Issue 2, 249-261

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