squares representing the pieces of paper under the document camera onto the

Squares representing the pieces of paper under the

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squares representing the pieces of paper under the document camera onto the SMARTboard. The teacher will pose a scenario to the students by saying, “Imagine your pieces of paper are 2 cookies. How would you share the cookies evenly between you and your partner?” The teacher will then ask the class to write a division sentence that would represent what they just did (2 ÷ 2 = 1). The teacher will then ask the students to take away one of the cookies and will ask them to use the paper and scissors to show their thinking in the new scenario of sharing one cookie with their partner. Will ask effective questions such as, “Will you get a whole cookie? Why or why not?”. Will ask the students to write a division sentence that shows how they shared the cookie evenly (1 ÷ 2 = ½) The teacher will then ask, “How many halves of cookie do we have?” to help lead the students write the division sentence in another way (2/2 ÷ 2 = ½ or 2 halves ÷ 2 = 1 half). May ask what they notice about the quotients for each of the different forms for the division sentence. (They both say half, but one is written with numbers only and the other is written in unit form). During the discussion the teacher will model the students’ thinking by drawing the squares under the document camera. Teacher will repeat the sequence with 1 ÷ 4. The teacher will ask questions such as, “What do you notice about each of the division sentence for when you divided the cookie between 2 people and when you divided it by 4 people?” to help correlate the parts of a Students will use nonlinguistic representations of cookies (square pieces of paper) to model their thinking as they work with their partner to show division of 2 cookies per person and 1 cookie per person. They will participate in whole-group discussion about what they notice about the whole or dividend of each division problem and the numerator of a fraction. Examples of the representations are shown below. 2 cookies: 1 cookie:
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fraction to the parts of a division problem. Independent Student Practice: Activity Description/Teacher Student Actions Exit ticket: The teacher will ask students to return to individual seating where they will complete the following exit ticket with 5 problems. Exit Ticket 1. Draw a picture that shows the division expression. Then write an equation and solve.
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  • Fall '16
  • Division, Fraction, partner, Elementary arithmetic, Divisor

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