Staging Rehabilitation Report all EMS activities to the operations section

Staging rehabilitation report all ems activities to

This preview shows page 4 - 7 out of 11 pages.

Staging Rehabilitation Report all EMS activities to the operations section chief. Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Anything used as a weapon designed to bring about mass deaths, casualties, and/or massive damage Grouped into the five categories (CBRNE) Chemical Agents Human-made substances that can have devastating effects on organisms Produce in liquid, powder, or vapor form First developed during WWI Classifications: Vesicants or blister agents (mustard gas or lewisite)
Image of page 4

Subscribe to view the full document.

Respiratory or choking agents (phosgene or chlorine) Nerve agents (sarin, soman, tabun, or VX nerve agent) Metabolic or blood agents (hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen chloride) Irritating agents (mace, chloropicrin, tear gas, capsicum/pepper spray, and dibenzoxazepine) Persistency and volatility are terms used to describe how long the agent will stay on a surface before it evaporates. Some agents can persist longer than 24 hours. Highly persistent agents such as VX nerve agent can remain for weeks or months whereas an agent that is highly volatile such as sarin will turn from liquid to gas and evaporate within minutes to seconds. Route of exposure describes how the agent most effectively enters the body. Agents can either be a vapor hazard (respiratory tract) or a contact hazard (skin) Vesicants (Blister Agents) Primary route of exposure is skin; however, if left on skin or clothing long enough, they can produce vapors and enter the respiratory tract. Cause burn-like blisters Usually cause the most damage to moist areas such as armpits, groin, and respiratory tract. Signs of exposure on skin: Irritation, burning, reddening Immediate intense pain (with lewisite and phosgene oxime) Formation of large blisters Gray discoloration (sign of permanent damage with phosgene oxime and lewisite) Swollen and irritated eyes, can cause permanent eye injury Signs of inhalation exposure: Hoarseness and stridor Severe cough Hemoptysis Severe dyspnea Sulfur Mustard: Often referred to military abbreviation H, it is an oily, yellow-brown substance that is generally considered persistent. WHen released, it has the distinct smell of garlic or mustard. Is quickly absorbed by the skin and mucous membranes and begins irreversible cell damage. Absorption happens in seconds with cell damage taking place in 1-2 minutes
Image of page 5
Patient experiences progressive reddening of the affected area, gradually developing into blisters similar to thermal third-degree burns. Lewisite and Phosgene Oxime: Abbreviation of L and CX Produces blister wounds similar to sulfur mustard, with a far more rapid onset Do not cause secondary cellular injury Vesicant Agent Treatment Ensure decontamination Assess ABCDE’s (Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Disability, Exposure) Secure airway and IV access & initiate rapid transport, preferably burn center Pulmonary Agents (Choking Agents) Primary route of exposure is respiratory tract. Once inside the lungs, they damage the lung tissue and fluid leaks into the lungs.
Image of page 6

Subscribe to view the full document.

Image of page 7
  • Fall '19

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern

Ask Expert Tutors You can ask 0 bonus questions You can ask 0 questions (0 expire soon) You can ask 0 questions (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes