matrix of domination and overcoming it thus transforming gender relationships

Matrix of domination and overcoming it thus

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matrix of domination and overcoming it, thus transforming gender relationships and conceptions in African societies and improving the situation of African women.” – Arndt, 2002 (what causes inequalities of women in Africa specifically? What puts African women at the bottom of not only patriarchial systems but international economic systems.) - What do we mean by gender? ‘Social construct which creates a binary set of roles based on the genders ‘man v women’ based on our sex. ‘The process of gendering is the process of creating ‘roles’ for those sexes, what ‘men’ and ‘women’ are expected to conform to’. - “Pursues substantive equality between men and women in Africa where gender inequality persistently reigns this feminism is not just for women. Its purpose is not to replace men with women, nor even to merely include more women in men’s worlds. Its purpose, rather, is to transform the very structures of our societies which produce and perpetuate gender inequalities in the first place. Feminists may seek to enact this transformation primarily by focusing on women’s situations and by advocating on their behalf but this does not mean it is only about women, or, indeed, only about women and men. Rather it is concerned with radically reimagining and reshaping all power relations, in which case it concerns human relations in general [intersectionality] (Dosekun 2007, 46). - Colonialism produced ‘gender’ norms in many situations. (In SA only SA men could travel to cities etc. which impacted the way gender constructed itself) – African feminist lens/theory takes this into account. - Ashcroft et al. 10998, 101 – “Feminism is of crucial interst to postcolonial discourse… Firstly, both patriarchy and imperialism can be seen to exert analogous forms of domination over those they render subordinate. Hence the experiences of women in patriarchy and those of colonised subjects can be paralleled in a number of respects, and both feminist and poscolonial politics oppose such dominance”
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Lecture 2: Prof. Barbara Boswell 06/05/2019 Feminism and Poscolonialism: - Feminism is of crucial interest to postcolonial discourse… Firstly, both patriarchy and imperialism can be seen to exert analogous forms of domination over those they render subordinate… Setting: Former Rhodesia (Zimbabwe): - British Colony during the 18 th and 19 th Century - First known as Southern Rhodesia, then declared “independence” from Britain in 1965 through UDI – majority white government – NIBMAR (No Independence Before Majority Rule) - Guerilla war of independence gained majority rule independence in 1980. Robert Mugabe became Prime Minister, then President - Robert Mugabe deposed 2017 - Emmerson Mnangagwa becomes President 2017 Characters are ‘Rhodesian’ at the time of the novel - Characters are still living in the colonial experience Form and Content: - Bildungsroman ‘Coming of Age Novel’ | ‘Novel of Development’ Many females in these novels don’t have the chance to leave home – however Tambudzai does.
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