Threats to sternula nereis nereis on king island are

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Threats to Sternula nereis nereis on King Island are similar to threats on mainland Tasmania and elsewhere in Australia, and centre around threats to beach nesting-sites (Woehler 2009). A rapid increase in 4WD and quad-bike traffic on beaches during summer months can destroy nests and eggs and crush chicks, dogs off-leash can predate on eggs and chicks, and recreational activities on King Island beaches can lead to disturbance to nesting and feeding shorebirds and terns (Woehler 2009). All disturbance events to migratory shorebirds reduce their capacity to store food for their migration, resulting in leaner birds with lower body masses unlikely to migrate successfully. To reduce human impacts to shorebirds and small terns will require innovative and concerted efforts by the King Island community through changes in lifestyle and traditional coastal activities. Recovery Actions specific to King Island Provide information and extension support to the King Island Natural Resource Management committee, King Island council, Government agencies and the local community on the location, significance and management of known breeding sites; Utilising existing knowledge, determine priority shorebird habitat and breeding sites for management; Install temporary/seasonal structures to prevent damage to these priority shorebird habitat and breeding sites; Notify the King Island community of the installation of structures and the reasons why they have been erected; Develop a King Island Code of Ethics for the recreational use of beaches addressing threats to shorebird habitat and breeding sites; Develop and implement a community education program for the management of threatened shorebirds on the island. King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 179
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Thinornis rubricollis rubricollis (Hooded Plover) Description Thinornis rubricollis rubricollis is a small, short-legged plover of ocean beaches of south-eastern Australia. The head and throat are black with a broad white rear collar, giving the bird its distinctive ‘hooded’ appearance. The bird is also blank on the shoulders, sometimes extending to the sides of the breast; otherwise silvery grey-brown above and white below. The bill is red with a black tip and the eyes are ringed with red. Immature Hooded Plovers have a plainer colouration and no hood. Hooded Plovers occur in pairs or family groups, and can be seen pottering slowly around jetsam and along the edges of spent waves. The species has a distinctive behaviour when approached; birds will run and then turn their back and squat motionless, or fly briskly over the waves to settle further along the beach. While flying, there is a distinctive broad white wingbar crossing the black flight feathers and a white tail with a black ‘hourglass’ pattern (Pizzey and Doyle 1980).
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