So you could have Page 44 Session 1 Exercise Sets Reps Chinups Pulldowns 5 68

So you could have page 44 session 1 exercise sets

This preview shows page 43 - 47 out of 59 pages.

So you could have:
Image of page 43
Page 44 Session 1 Exercise Sets Reps Chin‐ups/ Pull‐downs 5 6‐8 Row variation 5 6‐8 Lateral Raise 4 8‐10 Calf Raise variation 4 6‐8 Curls 4 8‐10 Pushdowns 4 8‐10 Session 2 Exercise Sets Reps Chin‐ups/ Pull‐downs 4 10‐12 Row variation 4 10‐12 Lateral Raise 3 12‐15 Calf Raise variation 3 12‐15 Curls 3 12‐15 Pushdowns 3 12‐15 These numbers are not set in stone, they just demonstrate how you could vary the loads and rep ranges each session. Day 1 could be 4 sets of 5 on everything, or 6 sets of 10, while Day 2 could be 2 sets of 15 or 3 sets of 20. In reality, it doesn’t matter too much, it’s simply a way of working through different ranges.
Image of page 44
Page 45 DUP for Beat-Up Lifters So your knees aren’t what they used to be? Your shoulders don’t like bench pressing, your hips creak from time to time, and deadlifts are out due to a old lower‐back injury? Don’t worry, DUP doesn’t discriminate. All you need to do is tweak your exercise selection to suit what you can and can’t do. As far as exercise rotation goes, here are the best substitutes for those who live with typical injuries and can’t perform regular squats, deadlifts and bench presses: Squat Substitutions Safety bar or cambered bar squats These are your best bet if an upper‐body injury keeps you from holding the bar when back squatting. High bar Olympic squats Make these your go‐to if you can squat, but can’t assume a low bar position. Box squats or pin squats These work if you can’t achieve full depth on a back squat. Front Squats Lots of lifters find their lower back takes over when back squatting. If this happens for you, go with front squats instead, as they keep you in a much more upright position. Deadlift Substitutions Sumo Deadlifts These are still a competition‐legal form of deadlifting, and you may already use a sumo stance anyway. If not, give it a go – you get less lower‐back involvement and more from your glutes and hamstrings. Block Pulls Can’t pull from the floor? Go with blocks or do them with the barbell on pins, anywhere from 2 to 6 inches off the floor. Paused Deadlifts If you’re worried about going too heavy and risking your back, do paused deadlifts where you make the initial pull, then pause with the bar at mid‐shin level for 1 to 2 seconds, then finish the movement.
Image of page 45
Page 46 Deficit Deadlifts Performed standing on a 1 to 3 inch platform and used for the same reasons as paused deadlifts. Trap Bar Deadlifts This is the deadlift equivalent of front squats. This is a much more quad‐dominant movement using the trap bar keeps you in a more upright position and allows you to keep a neutral spine easier. Bench Substitutions Swiss Bar Presses The Swiss bar (often called a football bar) has neutral handles, which can often be a more comfortable position for your shoulders. Board Presses Need to reduce the range of motion on your bench presses, perhaps due to a previous pec or shoulder injury? Go with board presses. Get a 1, 2 or 3‐inch board and have a partner hold it on your chest when you bench, or secure it around your torso with a resistance band if you train on your own.
Image of page 46
Image of page 47

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 59 pages?

  • Spring '15
  • Baumann
  • Barbell, Weight training, powerlifting, Weight training exercises, DUP, Bench press

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture