about themselves their braille use and what they thought of the UEB anthology

About themselves their braille use and what they

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about themselves, their braille use and what they thought of the UEB anthology. The research revealed that 73% of this cross section of regular braille readers had heard of UEB. 37.9% could read it without any difficulty. A further 49.5% could read it but more slowly than usual. 12.6% could read it but found it difficult. No one said that they were unable to read it. 67% of the participants said that the braille coding didn't cause any problems or that they noticed some differences but soon got over them. Of those people who had problems with the coding the major issue was the removal of contractions followed by the changes in punctuation coding followed by the removal of sequencing (in UEB wherever there is a space between words on the printed page there must be one in braille). Participants in the research had been given minimal information on the reasons for the proposed introduction of UEB and they also had not been given any information on the actual code changes. There were therefore two qualitative questions dealing with both the respondents specific queries on UEB and their personal views on UEB at the end of the questionnaire. There was a range of comments from people both in support of UEB and those who didn't see the need to change. The main objection to UEB was the increased space that it took. The results of this research were included in a paper to the UKAAF board in order to assist them in making a decision on the adoption of UEB in the United Kingdom. B. Introduction The UK Association of Accessible Formats (UKAAF) was keen to gather representative views of braille users on the new Unified English Braille Code (UEB). In 2008 the Braille Authority of the UK (BAUK) had undertaken a consultation of braille users. The consultation pack was sent out to over 4,000 users, producers,
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© RNIB 2011 intermediaries and stakeholders and 470 responses were received back. Of those people responding 347 did not want to see UEB adopted in the UK (76%). BAUK therefore recommended that UEB should not be introduced at that time. Shortly after the consultation BAUK merged with several other organisations to form UKAAF. UKAAF returned to the question of the introduction of UEB in 2011. RNIB had produced some research (Phillips A. and Beesley L. (2011) Braille Profiling Project) which suggested that the so called 'silent majority' would be more likely to support UEB and less likely to respond to the type of consultation undertaken by BAUK in 2008. UKKAF therefore commissioned this piece of research where a sample cross section of braille users were identified and all of them were then contacted and asked their views on UEB. C. Method C.1 Design The interview questions were designed to reflect both a quantitiative and qualitative approach. The first 12 questions had a specified choice of responses and the last two questions gave participants the opportunity to discuss more fully their views on the sample documentation and UEB more generally. Whilst emerging themes are discussed in the main body of the report, Appendix one
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