Then festive music begins which corresponds t rising

This preview shows page 29 - 31 out of 52 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Music for Ear Training
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 8 / Exercise 1
Music for Ear Training
Horvit/Koozin
Expert Verified
and feels the weight of her plight.  Then, festive music begins, which corresponds to the curtain rising.  For a moment Violetta is in two different worlds–her past and present–until she and the audience are drawn into extended flashback that constitutes most of the film.The opening scene takes place in the splendor and opulence of her home in better days, as she plays host to a lavish party and is soon introduced to Alfredo.  Waltz music permeates the atmosphere, and it is used to great effect in the opening choral number and the solos of Alfredo and Violetta during his toast.  Soon the two of them have retreated to a private room for a magnificent duet, in which Alfredo professes his love (“the heartbeat of the universe”), and Violetta does her best to pretend to be frivolous.
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Music for Ear Training
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 8 / Exercise 1
Music for Ear Training
Horvit/Koozin
Expert Verified
This film is a remarkably successful experiment in blending these two art forms, opera and cinema.  But it still requires an extra level of suspension of disbelief.  Opera is a magical world in which people don’t just speak, they sing.  And all of life is a song.  Verdi’s music conveys thatmagic, along with the Italian love of singing.  And this production is visually stunning in its beauty and detail.We’ll watch the opening twenty-one minutes of La Traviata without subtitles.  It’s not too hardto follow, and this is an extraordinarily rich viewing experience.  Enjoy!SummaryIn this lesson, we continued our exploration of the Romantic era, moving to the mid-nineteenth century and  later. We saw and heard video-recorded performances of solo piano works by two of the great GermanRomantic composers, Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms, as well as a scherzo for violin and piano by Brahms.  We returned to Italian opera with a consideration of one of the many magnificent works by the greatest Italian composer of opera, Giuseppe Verdi.Robert Schumann (1 810-1 856) was a pivotal figure in the Romantic era; he was known both as composer and music critic.  Of special importance was Schumann’s relationship with Johannes Brahms.  In1 853, a young Brahms traveled from his hometown of Hamburg to Dusseldorf to introduce himself to Schumann.  Brahms’ reception in the Schumann household would have lasting significance for his life and art.Johannes Brahms (1 833-1 897) was one of the great figures of the late Romantic era.  His four symphonies continued the line of Romantic Austro-German orchestral music established by Beethoven.  His miniature works bear the influence of Schumann, and all his mature music is distiguished by the incorporation of elements of folk music and dance rhythms. With his adherence to the principles of classical form, Brahms was widely viewed as one of the representatives of the “conservative” branch of late Romanticism.  Paradoxically, his textural clarity and procedures of motivic transformation became highly influential among the generationof post-Romantic composers who would explore musical modernism.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture