New mexicos new governor diego de vargas also

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New Mexico’s new governor Diego de Vargas also believed that Pueblo victory had sustained a wave of Indian rebellions across northern Mexico and inspired new ones.
1640 to 1700 (6)Many Pueblos had decided that they preferred a future under Spanish rule to one without it.According to some Pueblo accounts, a delegation representing several towns invited the Spanish to return.After Vargas reached Santa Fé, friars baptized more than a hundred Pueblo children born after 1680.Many Pueblo leaders asked Vargas to stand as godfather to their children to gain his protection.Popé’s successor Tupatú initiated peace talks and offered to join the Spanish against Pueblo holdouts.Vargas toured nearly two dozen towns, bullying most into submission.After returning to El Paso, he mustered several hundred men, most of them New Mexico refugees, and returned to Santa Fé in late 1693.But Vargas found the town in enemy hands.And it took the Spanish and their Pueblo allies two days to take it.Vargas had dozens executed, enslaved 400 women and children, and parceled them out tocolonists.It took nine more months to conquer most of the towns that refused to accept Spanish rule.In 1696, a Pueblo raid killed more than 25 colonists and friars.Vargas forced Indian allies to attack holdout towns and compel those in hiding to surrender, finally bringing the Pueblo War for Independence to an end.Hundreds of Pueblos fled, seeking shelter among Hopis and Navajos.Royal Charters For New Jersey and PennsylvaniaAs Pueblos gained control of New Mexico, Indians whom the English called Delawares watched thousands of Europeans stream into their lands.England staked claim to the area by conquering New Netherland, which gave Charles II more opportunities to reward supporters.In 1664, he granted title to land between the Hudson and Delaware rivers to two Carolinaproprietors, John Berkeley and George Carteret, who named their venture New Jersey.In 1676, Berkeley sold his share to a London-based group of Quakers, an act that split thecolony into East and West Jersey.William Penn, one of England’s most famous Quakers, was the son of an English admiral and a royal advisor.King Charles II repaid a debt to the deceased father and sought to rid England of the dissenting son by granting land west of the Delaware to Penn.He named it Pennsylvania.New Jersey and Pennsylvania roughly followed models set by New Netherland and Carolina, with proprietors promising European immigrants religious freedom.In 1665, New Jersey’s original proprietors also promised them a representative assembly and free trade within the English Empire, all of which attracted English from New England and eastern Long Island.Quakers and Baptists saw New Jersey as a place to worship freely.So did the ultraorthodox Puritans who despised them.
1640 to 1700 (7)Migrants from New Haven, unable to live with its merger with Connecticut, founded Newark in 1666.

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