These 4640 46 completed the survey and are included

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these, 4640 (46 %) completed the survey and are included in cross-sectional analyses for the current study. This response rate is typical to studies using similar procedures (i.e. internet recruitment from registrar sample) (Larimer et al. 2007 ; McCabe et al. 2005 ; Thombs et al. 2005 ; Turrisi et al. 2009 ). Those who scored 3 or more on the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS; Lesieur and Blume 1987 ) for lifetime gambling disorder, reported 1 or more consequences on the Gambling Problem Index (GPI; Neighbors et al. 2002 ), and met abuse or dependence criteria for alcohol or substance use (N = 233; 5.02 %) were further invited to complete a baseline assessment for a longitudinal gambling prevention trial (with web-based or in-person conditions and control), of which 199 completed the survey and enrolled in longitudinal trial (85.4 % of those eligible). The screening sample ( N = 4640) was 59.2 % female, averaged 19.8 years of age ( SD = 1.5 years), and reported race/ethnicity was 57.4 % White, 28.5 % Asian, 1.2 % Black, and 12.9 % Multiracial or Other. Of the sample, 20.5 % were freshman, 23.1 % sophomores, 33.2 % juniors, 23.0 % seniors, and .3 % were graduates or not actively enrolled. The longitudinal sample of participants ( N = 199) was 62.8 % male (this is due to males having higher incidents of problem gambling and substance use), averaged 20.1 years of age ( SD = 1.4 years), reported race/ethnicity was 53.3 % White, 28.5 % Asian, and 1.2 % Black, 18.3 % Multiracial or Other, and 18.1 % were freshman, 22.1 % sophomores, 34.2 % juniors, and 25.6 % were seniors. The recruited sample (both screening participants and longitudinal participants) were similar to campus rate in terms of ethnicity (44 % White with additional 14 % International, 27 % Asian, 3.5 % Black and 11.5 % other), gender (52 % women), and age (mean age 20.8). Measures and Assessment Procedures All measures were completed online via a secure server using DatStat Illume. After viewing an informed consent statement containing all elements of informed consent, participants who agreed to continue were routed to the surveys. All data were identified only by a unique participant identification number. The screening survey took approxi- mately 20 min to complete and participants were paid $10 for completion. Baseline and follow-up measures for eligible participants took approximately 30–45 min and partici- pants were compensated $40 for baseline and $50 for 12 month follow-up. Screening, baseline, and 12-month data were used for the current analysis. All measures and proce- dures were reviewed and approved by the affiliated Institutional Review Board. Demographics and Study Assignment Screening demographic variables included gender (coded as female vs. male), race/eth- nicity (White, Asian, Other), whether the participant was assigned to an intervention (web or in-person feedback) or to the control condition. J Gambl Stud 123
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Gambling Frequency Gambling frequency in the past 6 months was assessed using 12 items from the SOGS (Lesieur and Blume 1987 ). Participants indicated the frequency with which they engaged in 12 different types of gambling on a 5-point scale with 0 = Never , 1 = 1–10 times , 2 = More than 10 times, but less than weekly , 3 = Weekly or more than once a week , and 4 = Daily . An overall index of gambling frequency was calculated by summing across the
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