this definition Mattia insists like Irigaray that the object is not so easily

This definition mattia insists like irigaray that the

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this definition, Mattia insists, like Irigaray, that the object is not so easily spoken for (although it does determine, like a vanishing point, 327 This content downloaded from 129.100.179.102 on Tue, 12 Sep 2017 20:06:22 UTC All use subject to
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THE CENTENNIAL REVIEW the terms from which it is itself excluded). This response, which find an odd sort of power in the glorification of powerlessness, has be brilliantly characterized by Rey Chow as the typical move of th "Maoist," a gesture whose presence she demonstrates in Western c ture from Jane Eyre to the multicultural present. Finally, Matt closing remark, a statement which, like the work of Michel Foucau insists that discourse produces the entities which inhabit it, opens story to the world. By naming, in its final words, the book itself, th text in effect performs both its own dismissal and its own endorsemen dropping mimetic pretensions at the same moment in which it borrow for itself both the third person and the historic past ("Sono il fu Mat Pascal"), linguistic markers of facticity and truth in writing. With th final twist, then, Pirandello's novel emphasizes its narrative fram occupying, from within, the authorial position, that perspective whic chooses both the terms and the objects of representation. In this c (one which I would argue is typical of literary modernism), the autho subject is also both hero and object, thus taking up, in a representatio form of schizophrenia, each of the three distinct subject positions whic during the eighteenth century, congealed in the work of sentimen fiction. How then does such a conclusion respond to the scenario employ by Vené? First of all, it doesn't contradict either the narrative logic o the possibility of the transition which Vené outlines. As we have seen no new or revolutionary concepts for identity are introduced; in fact the concept of revolution itself is shown to have limits. On the oth hand, neither does Pirandello's text move to reaffirm the ontologi strength of pre-existing social and representational structures, w correspondingly catastrophic effects for the already excluded. On contrary, again like Butler on gender (who discusses the uses and abuses of each contradictory gender definition, retaining each an qualifying all), Pirandello's novel creates a discourse in which com ing visions of identity perform in turn, revealing the limits and streng for each. For Butler, the attempt is to create a social structure in whi gender possibilities are increasingly multiple23; for Pirandello, multip readings of identity are existential reality, in spite of modern soc pressures to exclude them from representation. While it would evidently be possible to overemphasize the ways which, in Pirandello's novel, identity is "recirculated" through "parodi proliferation and subversive play" (Butler 33)—Mattia, after all, is 328 This content downloaded from 129.100.179.102 on Tue, 12 Sep 2017 20:06:22 UTC All use subject to
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THE FASCIST IMAGINARY IN PESSOA AND PIRANDELLO
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