Another example is Shell Ideas360 an open competi tion platform initiated by

Another example is shell ideas360 an open competi

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Another example is Shell Ideas360, an open-competi- tion platform initiated by Shell. Students from universi- ties worldwide are invited to develop game-changing ideas for tackling energy, water, and food issues. Students can think virtually without any limita- tions and propose futuristic projects that may be difficult to implement but have the potential to change how these social issues are addressed. The Shell Ideas360 plat- form is not merely a space to submit projects. It also allows students to find partners (in the form of other students around the world) with whom they can develop their ideas. In addition, it provides an open chat room with experts who can act as coaches. In this way, Shell is correctly placing an emphasis on the CSR chal- lenges, rather than on itself. This type of approach is what stakeholders want to see. As one of our respondents asserted, “The organization shouldn’t place itself first, because attention should be directed to the subjects under discussion.” The big idea here is simple: Compa- nies need to demonstrate their commitment to listening to stakeholders — and to pursuing an authentic and effective dialogue around CSR topics. Laura Illia is an associate professor of corporate communication at IE Business School at IE University in Spain. Stefania Romenti is an assistant professor of corporate communication at IULM University in Milan, Italy. Stelios Zyglidopoulos is a reader in management at the University of Glasgow’s Adam Smith Business School in Scotland. Comment on this article at .mit.edu/x/57106, or contact the authors at [email protected] mit.edu. Reprint 57106. Copyright © Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2015. All rights reserved. Creating Effective Dialogue About Corporate Social Responsibility (Continued from page 21)
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  • Fall '15
  • Dr.DeenDayalUpa
  • Economics, Corporate social responsibility, MIT Sloan School of Management, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan Management Review, mit sloan management

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