Add display for the cardinal points by typing the

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Add display for the cardinal points by typing the letter Q and then look toward the west by typing Shift-W (recent versions of Stellarium) or using the mouse or arrow keys. To view the constellations, select constellations by typing the letter C , constellation labels by typing the letter V , and constellation boundaries by typing the letter B . (Optionally – include the constellation art by typing the letter R )
Hitting any of these keyboard shortcuts again will turn the respective item off again so you can view the sky with as much or as little additional information as you would like. Explore the evening sky by clicking the directional buttons: shift- N, shift-S, shift-E, shift-W (recent versions of Stellarium), or using the arrow keys or mouse to drag the screen. The letter A will turn the atmosphere off and on. To look straight up hit shift-Z (for zenith, some versions or use the arrow keys) and to go back to looking along the horizon hit ctrl-H (for home). To look around, you can also “drag” the sky by holding down the left mouse button and moving the mouse in a given direction, while the scroll-wheel will adjust the ‘field of view’ allowing you to see more (or less) of the night sky at one time. After you have explored the sky, answer the questions on this screen. For the purpose of these exercises, keep your ‘field of view’ (FOV at the bottom of the screen) to around 90 degrees as this could impact your answers. (Normal human binocular vision covers 114 degrees horizontally) Use the Stellarium software to answer these questions . 10.Which of the following constellations is visible when facing north?
11.Select the Constellation Art from the menu at the bottom of the screen (or type the letter R ) in Stellarium to see the art of the constellations.
12.Which direction are you facing if you can see the constellation Pisces?
Explorations of the Evening Sky In this part of the lab, we will explore the evening sky as it appears on March 15, 2018. We use constellations as a way to identify where things are in the sky. For example, we may want to know where a planet is, or if a planet is in our current evening sky. Although named for a characteristic pattern of stars, each constellation represents a specific area of the sky. To explore the evening sky in Stellarium, select Constellation Lines from the menu at the bottom of the screen (or hit C ) to outline each constellation. Now select the Sky and Viewing Options Window from the left side of the screen (or hit F4) and make sure Solar System Objects and Show planet markers are both
checked. Make sure the box next to Labels and Markers is checked and then slide the slider next to it all the way to the right. This will identify the planets in the night sky, even those which are too faint to be visible with your naked eye! (Note that hitting G will turn the ground on/off and allow you to see objects that would otherwise be below the horizon at this time of day. Explore your current evening sky by finding and identifying the planets or other objects such as satellites, asteroids, and comets that you see.

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