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Different rhetorical approaches but can ultimately be

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different rhetorical approaches but can ultimately be seen as having the same effect on the viewer/reader. Food, Inc. is a documentary made in 2008 by Robert Kenner that examines corporate farming in the United States, concluding that our agriculture makes food that is
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unhealthy, in a way that is environmentally harmful and also extremely abusive of both animals and workers. On the cover it says, “You’ll never look at dinner the same way” along with a picture of a cow standing in a bright green field with blue skies. The cover alone is a rhetorical strategy used by the producer. It’s not a scary cover by any means, but agrees with the thought of most Americans, that our food is produced by happy healthy animals in nice clean farming areas (which is quickly displayed in the film to be not true at all). The documentary presents facts and real life videos to persuade the audience to take action, make a change, and have a voice about the food they eat. It’s one thing to read an article or story about why one should be a vegetarian or demand better food inspections or quality, but seeing a real video of how our food is really being made is a different story. The film explains that the extremely high demand of fast food and mass production is the reasoning behind the way our food is produced. It brings you inside slaughterhouses, chicken farms, and factory farms dealing with produce to show you how
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different rhetorical approaches but can ultimately be seen...

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